November 21, 2017 |
CCTA Reduces Cost, Time and Rehospitalizatin When Triaging Patients with Chest Pain
July 31, 2013  | 

Stony Brook, NY - A study of two sets of 894 matched Emergency Department (ED) patients presenting with chest pain revealed that the use of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) led to fewer hospital admissions and shorter ED stays. According to lead researcher Michael Poon, MD, of Stony Brook University School of Medicine, the findings provide evidence that CCTA offers an alternative means of improving the triage of chest pain patients. The paper, “Associations Between Routine Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography and Reduced Unnecessary Hospital Admissions, Length of Stay, Recidivism Rates, and Invasive Coronary Angiography in the Emergency Department Triage of Chest Pain,” will be published online in the August 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

According to the National Health Statistics Report, chest pain leads to more than six million ED visits and more than $10 billion in hospital costs per year. The use of CCTA may help emergency room physicians evaluate patients with chest pain.

Dr. Poon and colleagues completed an analysis of data on thousands of Stony Brook patients with chest pain who received either standard evaluation for acute coronary symptoms, which included ED cardiac monitoring with electrocardiograms and blood tests, or CCTA from January 1, 2008, to April 30, 2010. When comparing two matched groups of 894 patients, they found that patients who with standard evaluation had a 5.5 times greater risk for hospital admission and an ED length of stay 1.6 times longer than those who had undergone CCTA. Continue>

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