November 18, 2017 |
Study Shows Increased Survival in Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer
December 10, 2013  | 

Bethesda, MD - Men with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer who received the chemotherapy drug docetaxel given at the start of standard hormone therapy lived longer than patients who received hormone therapy alone, according to early results from a National Institutes of Health-supported randomized controlled clinical trial. 

The independent Data and Safety Monitoring Committee overseeing the trial recommended to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of NIH, that the study results be made public because a recent planned interim analysis showed the prolongation in overall survival. Full details from this early analysis will be presented at a scientific meeting in 2014 and in a peer-reviewed publication.

The study enrolled 790 men with metastatic prostate cancer between July 2006 and November 2012 in a trial known as E3805. All patients started treatment by receiving a form of hormone therapy known as ADT (androgen deprivation therapy). Androgens regulate male sex characteristics and can stimulate prostate cancer cells.

Men received either ADT alone or ADT with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel every three weeks over a period of 18 weeks. In addition to examining whether the study participants lived longer with the addition of chemotherapy, investigators looked at whether the extent of a patient’s metastatic disease was high or low at the start of treatment. Approximately two thirds of patients had a high extent of disease which, according to the study, meant the disease had spread to major organs such as the liver, had a spread resulting in four or more bone lesions, or both. Continue>

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