November 18, 2017 |
Sepsis Study Comparing Three Treatment Methods Shows Same Survival Rate
March 20, 2014  | 

Bethesda, MD - Survival of patients with septic shock was the same regardless of whether they received treatment based on specific protocols or the usual high-level standard of care, according to a five-year clinical study. The large-scale randomized trial, named ProCESS for Protocolized Care for Early Septic Shock, was done in 31 academic hospital emergency departments across the country and was funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), a component of the National Institutes of Health.

The results of the trial, led by Derek C. Angus, M.D., M.P.H., and Donald M. Yealy, M.D., of the University of Pittsburgh, and funded by NIGMS appear online in The New England Journal of Medicine.

"ProCESS set out to determine whether a specific protocol would increase the survival rates of people with septic shock. What it showed is that regardless of the method used, patient survival was essentially the same in all three treatment groups, indicating that sepsis patients in these clinical settings were receiving effective care,” said Sarah Dunsmore, Ph.D., who managed the ProCESS trial for NIGMS.

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality lists sepsis as the most expensive condition treated in U.S. hospitals, costing more than $20 billion in 2011.

The ProCESS trial set out to test three approaches to sepsis care. It enrolled 1,341 patients randomly divided into these groups: Continue>

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