March 22, 2018 |
New Guidance System Could Improve Minimally Invasive Surgery
April 1, 2014  | 

Baltimore, MD - Johns Hopkins researchers have devised a computerized process that could make minimally invasive surgery more accurate and streamlined using equipment already common in the operating room.

In a report published recently in the journal Physics in Medicine and Biology, the researchers say initial testing of the algorithm shows that their image-based guidance system is potentially superior to conventional tracking systems that have been the mainstay of surgical navigation over the last decade.

“Imaging in the operating room opens new possibilities for patient safety and high-precision surgical guidance,” says Jeffrey Siewerdsen, Ph.D., a professor of biomedical engineering in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “In this work, we devised an imaging method that could overcome traditional barriers in precision and workflow. Rather than adding complicated tracking systems and special markers to the already busy surgical scene, we realized a method in which the imaging system is the tracker and the patient is the marker.”

Siewerdsen explains that current state-of-the-art surgical navigation involves an often cumbersome process in which someone — usually a surgical technician, resident or fellow — manually matches points on the patient’s body to those in a preoperative CT image. This process, called registration, enables a computer to orient the image of the patient within the geometry of the operating room. “The registration process can be error-prone, require multiple manual attempts to achieve high accuracy and tends to degrade over the course of the operation,” Siewerdsen says. Continue>

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