November 18, 2017 |
Close-to-the-Heart Catheters Safer for Hospitalized Children
March 20, 2013  | 

Baltimore, MD - Location, location, location. A new Johns Hopkins Children’s Center study shows the real-estate mantra also holds true when it comes to choosing correct catheter placement in children.

The research findings, described online March 18 in JAMA Pediatrics, show that catheters in children inserted in a vessel in the arm or leg and not threaded into a large vein near the heart are nearly four times as likely to dislodge, cause vein inflammation or dangerous blood clots as are catheters advanced into major vessels near the heart.

Clinicians sometimes forgo threading a peripherally inserted central venous catheter, or PICC line, close to the heart and leave the PICC line in a peripheral vein in the arm or leg instead — a choice dictated by the ease and speed of placement or a child’s overall condition or anatomy.

The study findings, however, suggest that leaving the device in a non-central vein should only be done as last resort, the researchers say.

“Clinicians should carefully weigh the ease and speed of non-central vein placement against the higher complication risk that our study found goes with it,” says senior investigator and pediatric infectious disease specialist Aaron Milstone, M.D., M.H.S.

Non-central, smaller veins, especially those in the arm, are narrower, thinner and more prone to injury than major vessels near the heart, the researchers say. Thus, a catheter can easily damage the protective coating on the walls of such veins and encourage the formation of blood clots that, in the worst-case scenario, can dislodge and travel to the lungs or heart, causing a pulmonary embolism or heart damage. Continue>

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