September 24, 2017 |
New Monoclonal Antibody Developed, Targets Proteins Inside Cancer Cells
March 25, 2013  | 

New York, NY - Researchers have discovered a unique monoclonal antibody that can effectively reach inside a cancer cell, a key goal for these important anticancer agents, since most proteins that cause cancer or are associated with cancer are buried inside cancer cells. Scientists from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Eureka Therapeutics have collaborated to create the new human monoclonal antibody, which targets a protein associated with many types of cancer and is of great interest to cancer researchers.

Unlike other human therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, which can target only proteins that remain on the outside of cancer cells, the new monoclonal antibody, called ESK1, targets a protein that resides on the inside of the cell.

ESK1 is directed at a protein called WT1, which is overexpressed in a range of leukemias and other cancers including myeloma and breast, ovarian, and colorectal cancers. WT1 is a high priority target for cancer drugs because it is an oncogenic protein, meaning that it supports the formation of cancer. In addition, it is found in few healthy cells, so there are less likely to be side effects from drugs that target it.

David A. Scheinberg, MD, PhD“This is a new approach for attacking WT1, an important cancer target, with an antibody therapy. This is something that was previously not possible,” said David A. Scheinberg, MD, PhD, Chair of the Sloan-Kettering Institute’s Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program and an inventor of the antibody. “There has not been a way to make small molecule drugs that can inhibit WT1 function. Our research shows that you can use a monoclonal antibody to recognize a cancer-associated protein inside a cell, and it will destroy the cell.” Continue>

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