September 23, 2017 |
New Test Predicts If Breast Cancer Will Spread
June 4, 2014  | 

Bronx, NYA test that counts the number of locations in tumor specimens where tumor cells may invade blood vessels predicted the risk of distant spread, or metastasis, for the most common type of breast cancer. The study was led by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI)─designated Albert Einstein Cancer Center of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care and was published online in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI).

“Tests assessing metastatic risk can help doctors identify which patients should receive aggressive therapy and which patients should be spared,” said Thomas Rohan, M.D., Ph.D., the lead and corresponding author of the study and professor and chair of epidemiology & population health at Einstein and Montefiore.

To measure the test’s effectiveness, the researchers used it on about 500 breast tumor specimens that had been collected over a 20-year period. The test proved more accurate in predicting the risk of distant tumor spread than a test closely resembling the leading breast cancer prognostic indicator on the market.

According to the NCI, 232,340 American women developed breast cancer last year and 39,620 women died from the disease. It is the most common cancer among women in the United States. Death from breast cancer is mainly due to distant metastasis, when cancer cells in the primary tumor invade blood vessels and travel via the bloodstream to form tumors elsewhere in the body. Continue>

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