September 23, 2017 |
Mechanism of Chemotherapy Resistance in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Identified
July 8, 2014  | 

Buffalo, NY - Researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) have identified a mechanism of breast cancer cells that leads to chemotherapy resistance in inflammatory breast cancer. These preclinical findings, published online ahead of print in the International Journal of Oncology, provide evidence for a potential therapeutic approach that will restore sensitivity to chemotherapy and improve treatment of inflammatory breast cancer tumors.

“This study forms the basis for future research in patients with breast cancer and offers hope for targeted therapy for patients with aggressive triple-negative inflammatory breast cancer,” said lead researcher Mateusz Opyrchal, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Oncology at RPCI.

Inflammatory breast cancer is the most aggressive type of advanced breast cancer and is characterized by rapid development, resistance to chemotherapy, early metastases and a poor prognosis. Inflammatory breast cancer cells display a triple-negative breast cancer phenotype that lacks the receptors needed to promote tumor growth. Therefore, common treatments such as endocrine therapy and molecular targeting of the HER-2 receptor are not effective for this breast cancer subtype. No targeted therapy has been approved for noninflammatory and inflammatory triple-negative breast cancer tumors, and the standard of therapy for these tumors is a combination of conventional cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. Continue>

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