November 18, 2017 |
Experts Question Value of Common Superbug Control Practices
August 22, 2014  | 

Cologne, DE - The jury is still out on the effectiveness of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) superbug control policies in hospitals, according to leading infectious disease experts in a Viewpoint published in The Lancet. In particular, screening and isolating infected patients — which have long been regarded as the gold standard MRSA prevention strategy and are required by law in some countries — have poor evidence for their effectiveness, say the authors. 

After reviewing studies on preventing the spread of MRSA in hospitals over the past decade, the authors argue that although various approaches to tackle MRSA have been examined, most of the research has looked at bundles of control measures, and we don't yet know which individual components work best, or whether some of them could be omitted without increasing transmission.

Gerd Fätkenheuer, study co-author and Professor of Infectious Diseases at the University Hospital Cologne in Germany and President of the German Society of Infectious Diseases explains, “In the haste to do something against the rising tide of MRSA infection, measures were adopted that seemed plausible but were not properly assessed, bundling the effective and harmless with the ineffective and harmful. We know, for example, that isolating patients can result in anxiety and depression and fewer visits by doctors and nurses.” Continue>

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