September 26, 2017 |
Taming the Inflammatory Response in Kidney Dialysis
December 18, 2014  | 

Philadelphia, PA — Frequent kidney dialysis is essential for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, but it can also cause systemic inflammation, leading to complications such as cardiovascular disease and anemia. Such inflammation can be triggered when the complement cascade, part of the body's innate immune system, is inadvertently activated by modern polymer-based dialysis blood filters. New work by Penn researchers has found an effective way to avoid these problems by temporarily suppressing complement during dialysis. Their work appears online in Immunobiology ahead of print.

Over the past several years, lead author John Lambris, PhD, the Dr. Ralph and Sallie Weaver Professor of Research Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and his colleagues have developed small molecule versions of the drug compstatin, which inhibits a component of the complement immune response called C3. Lambris explains that this next-generation compound, called Cp40, "is a small peptide similar to cyclosporine in many aspects, however it uses a different mechanism of action."

Previous studies by Lambris and his team, in which modern polymer-based hemodialysis filters were perfused with human blood, showed significant complement activation and an increase in inflammatory biomarkers. This response could be suppressed using compstatin, suggesting that it might be used in dialysis to decrease the inflammatory response side effect. Continue>

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