September 23, 2017 |
Vitamin C May Prevent Lung Problems in Babies Born to Pregnant smokers
May 9, 2013  | 

PORTLAND, OR – Of course pregnant women are advised not to smoke during pregnancy because it can harm the baby's lungs and lead to wheezing and asthma, among other problems. If a woman absolutely can't kick the habit, taking vitamin C during pregnancy may improve her newborn's lung function and prevent wheezing in the first year of life, according to a study presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Washington, DC.

"Vitamin C is a simple, safe and inexpensive treatment that may decrease the impact of smoking during pregnancy on childhood respiratory health," said lead author Cynthia T. McEvoy, M.D., M.C.R., F.A.A.P., associate professor of pediatrics at Oregon Health & Science University Doernbecher Children's Hospital.

The study included 159 women who were less than 22 weeks pregnant and were unable to quit smoking. Participants were randomly assigned to take either one 500-milligram capsule of vitamin C or a placebo each day with a prenatal vitamin. Neither the study investigator nor the women knew what was in the capsule they were taking. In addition, a group of nonsmoking pregnant women were also studied.

Investigators tested the newborns' pulmonary function at about 48 hours of life. They measured how the newborn breathed in and out, how easily the baby's lungs moved and how big the baby's lungs were. Results showed that babies born to smoking women who took vitamin C had significantly improved lung function at birth compared to babies whose mothers took a placebo. Continue>

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