November 21, 2017 |
Safety First Archives

January 10, 2017 | Safety First

Oak Brook, IL — A study in the January issue of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety examined how the quality of primary care clinicians’ workup, procedures or tests performed to arrive at diagnosis can delay diagnoses of colorectal cancer. Diagnostic errors affect millions of patients each year, resulting in significant illness or death. Missed or delayed colorectal cancer diagnoses represent a major share of medical malpractice claims. Yet, little i [...]
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December 9, 2016 | Safety First

South Hill, VA — Advanced Ultra-Violet
Systems’ proven germicidal enclosure, now in place in many leading hospitals has also found a home in the cafeteria. The AUVS KR615
Germicidal Enclosure was developed specifically to address
the issue of mobile devices that move freely around hospitals and
are known agents of cross-contamination. Similar issues exist in the food service industry where cell phones and other small food-handling devices frequently come in c [...]
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October 25, 2016 | Safety First

Clifton, NJ – Effective Patient Ambulation protocols can improve patient outcomes and save hospitals significant costs. “The problem is, for a variety of reasons, many hospitals do not have such protocols in place,” says Blickman Executive Vice President Nick Marinis. To help clinician facilitate safe, early patient ambulation, Blickman, the long-time national leader in stainless steel hospital equipment and developer of the NezzieTM Patient Ambulation device, has introduce new [...]
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February 1, 2016 | Safety First

Oak Brook, IL – Joint Commission Resources, Inc. recently released the January 2016 issue of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety. The issue features an article by M. Michael Shabot, MD, Memorial Hermann Health System (MHHS), and Mark R. Chassin, MD, MPP, MPH, The Joint Commission, and their co-authors on how MHHS used the Joint Commission Center for Transforming Healthcare’s Targeted Solutions Tool® (TST®) to improve hand hygiene compliance; imp [...]
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November 19, 2015 | Safety First

Houston, TX – The continued marketing and use of experimental stem cell-based interventions inside and outside the United States is problematic and unsustainable, according to a new paper by science policy and bioethics experts at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy and Wake Forest University. Disillusioned patients, tired of waiting for the cures they were promised, are seeking unproven stem cell-based treatments that are causing more harm than good, said the experts, [...]
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August 21, 2015 | Safety First

New York, NY - Young nurses, those working night shifts and longer hours at higher risk for needle sticks, muscle strains and sprains. Strains, sprains and needle sticks are among the most common non-fatal injuries associated with nursing, and research suggests that newly licensed nurses are at greater risk for these injuries than their more experienced counterparts. A new study conducted by RN Work Project, and published in the International Journal of Nursing Studies, find [...]
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July 29, 2015 | Safety First

Cambridge, MA - LiveData, Inc. announced that Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has expanded its deployment of LiveData PeriOp Manager™, adding LiveData OR-Schedule Board™ to its growing patient safety and operational intelligence deployments. A key module in LiveData PeriOp Manager, OR-Schedule Board provides a large-screen view of the day's surgical cases, showing the real-time status of all rooms in the OR suite with case milestone indications and alerts. It dyna [...]
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June 18, 2015 | Safety First

Rockville, MD - An analysis that included information from more than 57,000 screening colonoscopies suggests that higher adenoma detection rates may be associated with up to 50 percent to 60 percent lower lifetime colorectal cancer incidence and death without higher overall costs, despite a higher number of colonoscopies and potential complications, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA. Screening colonoscopy reduces colorectal cancer death risk through detection and treatm [...]
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May 15, 2015 | Safety First

Chicago, Il - Public health advisories from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Health Canada were associated with significant reductions in the rate of dispensing of codeine to postpartum women, according to a study in the May 12 issue of JAMA. Some patients are ultra-rapid metabolizers of codeine, with prevalence ranging from 2 percent to 40 percent. Nursing mothers who take codeine may be putting their infant at risk if they carry the gene variants for elevated activity of an enz [...]
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December 23, 2014 | Safety First

Baltimore, MD - Results of a small Johns Hopkins Children’s Center study show that hospitalized children given high-dose IV infusions of the antibiotic vancomycin to treat drug-resistant bacterial infections face an increased risk for kidney damage — an often reversible but sometimes serious complication. The findings, published in the December issue of the journal Annals of Pharmacotherapy, highlight the importance of prescribing the medication cautiously, the investigators say, an [...]
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December 3, 2014 | Safety First

Oak Brook, IL - Patient engagement in practice improvement projects resulted in enhancements to the health care delivery system at University of Wisconsin (UW) Health, Madison, Wisconsin, as well as provided unique and essential contributions, according to an article, “Engaging Patients at the Front Lines of Primary Care Redesign: Operational Lessons for an Effective Program,” in the December 2014 issue of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety. Current [...]
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November 13, 2014 | Safety First

Dallas, TX – A study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Infection Control recently confirmed the effectiveness of new technology in reducing the number of hospital surface bacteria by more than 99 percent at least eight weeks after initial application – essentially eliminating dangerous pathogens likeClostridium difficile (C. diff) from the hospital landscape.  Titled “Long-Term Efficacy of a Self-Disinfecting Coating in an Intensive [...]
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October 17, 2014 | Safety First

London, UK - In the battle against Ebola, incentives from governments and healthcare policymakers have been and will continue to be vital for advancing the current treatment pipeline, by mitigating the risk and up-front costs from pharmaceutical companies, says an analyst with research and consulting firm GlobalData. Daian Cheng, Ph.D., GlobalData’s Analyst covering Infectious Diseases, states that despite a clear need for novel therapeutic approaches to combat Ebola, the infection has no [...]
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October 9, 2014 | Safety First

Atlanta, GA - A sanitation program currently being widely implemented in low-income communities in India significantly increases latrine coverage but does not actually improve health, a study involving 100 rural villages, published in The Lancet Global Health has found. The sanitation intervention delivered under the terms of the Government of India’s Total Sanitation Campaign — the world’s largest sanitation initiative — provided almost 25,000 individuals in rural India [...]
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September 16, 2014 | Safety First

Harrisburg, NC — In recent years, the serious risks posed by MRSA infections make advanced sanitization technology and hygiene methods essential to protecting public health. Clearstream, LLC maintains that these infections can be reduced through sophisticated application protocols and advanced long-term static antimicrobial technologies. According to a previous study, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Presbyterian Hospital was able to reduce MRSA by 90% in the medical ICU&r [...]
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September 2, 2014 | Safety First

Bethesda, MD - Initial human testing of an investigational vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease will begin this week by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. The early-stage trial will begin initial human testing of a vaccine co-developed by NIAID and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and will evaluate the experimental vaccine’s safety and ability to generate an immune system response in healthy adults. Testing will take place [...]
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August 22, 2014 | Safety First

Cologne, DE - The jury is still out on the effectiveness of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) superbug control policies in hospitals, according to leading infectious disease experts in a Viewpoint published in The Lancet. In particular, screening and isolating infected patients — which have long been regarded as the gold standard MRSA prevention strategy and are required by law in some countries — have poor evidence for their effectiveness, say the authors.  Aft [...]
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August 4, 2014 | Safety First

Chicago, IL – Adoption of hourly rounds schedules for nurses working in acute care hospitals may improve patient safety and overall satisfaction with care provided, according to research reported in the Journal for Healthcare Quality, the peer reviewed publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality. Nursing leadership at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston investigated whether a standard hourly nursing rounding process implemented though a formal education progr [...]
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August 1, 2014 | Safety First

St. Louis, MO — Everyone involved in the academic chemical research enterprise — from researchers and principal investigators to university leadership — has an important role to play in establishing and promoting a strong, positive safety culture, says a new report, Safe Science: Promoting a Culture of Safety in Academic Chemical Research, from the National Research Council. This requires a constant commitment to safety organization-wide and emphasis on identifyi [...]
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July 14, 2014 | Safety First

Washington, DC — Using an expensive agent to prevent blood clots in kidney failure patients’ dialysis catheters may turn out to be less costly overall due to its ability to reduce medical complications, according to a study appearing in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is a medication used to break up blood clots that occur in the vessels of patients having a heart attack. A recent clinical trial rev [...]
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June 30, 2014 | Safety First

Jerusalem, IL - The ability of microorganisms to overcome antibiotic treatments is one of the top concerns of modern medicine. The effectiveness of many antibiotics has been reduced by bacteria's ability to rapidly evolve and develop strategies to resist antibiotics. Bacteria achieve this by specific mechanisms that are tailored to the molecular structure or function of a particular antibiotic. For example, bacteria would typically develop drug resistance by evolving a mutation that breaks [...]
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June 13, 2014 | Safety First

Charlotte, NC – DebMed®, announced recently that its methodology used to calculate whether or not healthcare workers are cleaning their hands as frequently as they should has been proven accurate in a research study published in the June 2014 issue of the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC).  The researchers at Greenville Health System, Greenville, SC, also state healthcare workers only cleaning their hands as they go in and out of patient rooms, which is a common practic [...]
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May 12, 2014 | Safety First

Baltimore, MD - Children delivered by cesarean section and those given antibiotics during early infancy appear more prone to developing allergic inflammation of the esophagus according to results of a study by investigators from the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and Harvard Medical School. The findings, published online May 2 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, reveal that early antibiotic treatment and C-section delivery may somehow precipitate disease devel [...]
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March 28, 2014 | Safety First

Columbus, OH - About 1 percent of all emergency room visits are prompted by near-death experiences in infants, such as extended periods without breathing or sudden changes in skin pallor or muscle tone. What causes these frightening experiences is often unknown, but the result can be long hospital stays and neurological impairment. Now, a study of these apparent life-threatening events — called ALTEs — suggests that infants who experience them have abnormal regulation of esophageal [...]
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March 13, 2014 | Safety First

Sylmar, CA - It has been more than 10 years since the clinical battle began with community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and doctors are still grappling with how to diagnose, treat and prevent this virulent form of staph infection.As MRSA cases have increased dramatically over the decade, so have the number of skin abscesses — generally pus-filled boils or pimples with discharge — that characterize these infections. Now, researchers from UCLA have issue [...]
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February 19, 2014 | Safety First

Stanford, CA - A new type of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) test could be an alternative to standard positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging for assessing cancer in children and young adults, but without exposure to radiation that has been shown to increase the risk of secondary cancers in later life.  In The Lancet Oncology, a research team from the Stanford University School of Medicine reports that the new scanning technique, which uses an iron sup [...]
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January 28, 2014 | Safety First

Springfield, OR — Improving communication among members of surgical teams has been shown to improve outcomes for patients. The surgical staff at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend has begun training in a nationally recognized surgical safety initiative designed to enhance operating room communication. Known as TeamSTEPPS, the program uses communications tactics such as call backs, handoffs, briefings and debriefings among all members of the surgical team to optimize clini [...]
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December 10, 2013 | Safety First

Orlando, FL – Vestagen Technical Textiles, Inc., today announced that existing investor Advent Life Sciences was joined by new investors Sofinnova HealthQuest Capital and the Clearwell Group bringing total investments to $15.5 million.  The additional funds will support expanded commercialization of Vestex®, the first in a new class of active barrier protective fabrics for everyday use that are clinically proven to prevent or reduce the acquisition and retention of microbes a [...]
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December 4, 2013 | Safety First

Aurora, CO – American Sentinel University’s new e-book, ‘Are You Prepared to Identify and Prevent the Three Infections That Make Up Two-Thirds of All Health Care Associated Infections?’ helps nurses build the clinical skills to minimize the occurrence of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). This e-book serves as a health care professional’s go-to resource for basic intervention methods and prevention measures for a successful nursing career. It is availabl [...]
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October 9, 2013 | Safety First

Baltimore, MD - A team of pediatric neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center has developed a way to minimize dangerous radiation exposure in children with a condition that requires repeat CT scans of the brain. The experts say they reduced exposure without sacrificing the diagnostic accuracy of the images or compromising treatment decisions. The approach, described ahead of print in a report in the Journal of Neurosurgery, calls for using fewer X-ray snap [...]
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September 24, 2013 | Safety First

Rockville, MD- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requiring color changes to the writing on Duragesic (fentanyl) pain patches so they can be seen more easily. This is part of an effort to prevent accidental exposure to the patches, which can cause serious harm and death in children, pets, and others.  Similar changes are being requested for the generic fentanyl patches.  We are also reminding patients and health care professionals that fentanyl patches are dangerous even af [...]
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September 19, 2013 | Safety First

Atlanta, GA - Every year, more than two million people in the United States get infections that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die as a result, according to a new report issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  The report, Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, 2013, presents the first snapshot of the burden and threats posed by antibiotic-resistant germs. The threats are ranked in categories: urgent, serious, and concerning.  Th [...]
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September 16, 2013 | Safety First

Baltimore, MD - New research from Johns Hopkins suggests that it may not be the steroids in spinal shots that provide relief from lower back pain, but the mere introduction of any of a number of fluids, such as anesthetics and saline, to the space around the spinal cord. For decades, epidural steroid injections have been the most common nonsurgical treatment for lower back pain even though extensive research shows mixed results. Placebo-controlled studies have found benefit only 60 percent of t [...]
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August 26, 2013 | Safety First

Bethesda, MD - Hodgkin lymphoma survivors who received certain radiation and chemotherapy regimens were at increased risk of subsequently developing stomach cancer, according to a study by scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health. The study appeared today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. While the cure rate for Hodgkin lymphoma is high, there is a risk of developing secondary malignancies, such as breast cancer, lung cancer and stomach can [...]
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August 7, 2013 | Safety First

Munich, DE – CIM med, the specialist for stationary and mobile carrier systems, has introduced its “Barrier Nursing Cart.” This mobile system provides caregivers with all the materials needed for protection against infection. The goal is to make working in hygienic conditions is easier and portable. This space-saving roll stand was developed in a collaboration with the nursing staff at the Royal Sussex County Hospital in Brighton, Great Britain to best meet CIM med’s fund [...]
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July 31, 2013 | Safety First

Baltimore, MD - Pediatric cancer patients whose central lines are used to treat them at home develop three times as many dangerous bloodstream infections from their devices than their hospitalized counterparts, according to the results of a new Johns Hopkins Children’s Center study.  Findings of the research, reported online in the journal Pediatric Blood & Cancer, provide valuable insight into the safety of central line uses outside the hospital and underscore the need to c [...]
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July 16, 2013 | Safety First

Information provided by American Sentinel University Aurora, CO - The guidelines for hand hygiene measures that should precede and follow patient encounters are well defined. Yet research shows that doctors, nurses, and other caregivers are pretty bad at adhering to them – and are only in compliance from 30 percent to 48 percent of the time, depending on which study is being cited. Research has identified some of the factors that are predictors of poor compliance with hand hygiene measur [...]
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June 25, 2013 | Safety First

Houston, TX - A Star Wars-like robot, more than 5-feet tall, is fighting germs at The Methodist Hospital. The TRU-D, or Total Room Ultraviolet Disinfection robot, targets bacteria and viruses commonly found in hospitals. The robot emits natural ultraviolet light that modifies the DNA structure of the pathogens’ cells which prevents them from reproducing. “Any organism that can’t reproduce can’t cause infection by colonizing on patients’ bodies,” said Mario S [...]
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June 10, 2013 | Safety First

Aurora, CO – Nearly seven million hospitalized patients each year acquire infections while being treated for other conditions. The culprit, according to a study published in the American Journal of Infection Control, is nurse burnout and has been linked to higher rates of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). “There is a tendency for nurses to get tired and want to take a break when they are taking on a heavier than normal load of patients, so they may cut corners to get work do [...]
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June 1, 2013 | Safety First

Stony Brook, NY – Bed bugs now need to watch their step. Researchers at Stony Brook University have developed a safe, non-chemical resource that literally stops bed bugs in their tracks. This innovative new technology acts as a man-made web consisting of microfibers 50 times thinner than a human hair which entangle and trap bed bugs and other insects. This patent-pending technology is being commercialized by Fibertrap, a private company that employs non-toxic pest control methods [...]
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April 23, 2013 | Safety First

Bethesda, MD - Bacterial communities called biofilms can quickly clog medical devices such as stents, catheters and water filters by forming 3-dimensional streamers that block flow. Bacteria flowing through a tube form a green biofilm on the walls. Bacteria tagged red that flow through the chamber afterward get caught in a sticky matrix, forming streamers that clog the channel.  A research team led by Drs. Howard A. Stone and Bonnie L. Bassler of Princeton University set out to bette [...]
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March 12, 2013 | Safety First

Evansville, IN - With the spotlight on preventing hospital readmissions, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) completed a project that clearly demonstrates the value of community-based approaches to improve care transitions. The result in the Evansville area, including Vincennes, was a 14.74 percent reduction in 30-day rehospitalizations, using a process that can be duplicated in your community. Health Care Excel (HCE), Indiana’s Quality Improvement Organization (QIO), w [...]
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March 7, 2013 | Safety First

Fastest disinfection time and twice the reuse life among OPA-based disinfectants LITTLE FALLS, N.J. - Cantel Medical Corp., has officially launched RAPICIDE® OPA/28, an ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) based high-level disinfectant for semi-critical medical devices, to multiple segments of the healthcare market. A 510(k) cleared product by the FDA, RAPICIDE OPA/28 high-level disinfectant offers a reuse period for up to 28 days, twice the reuse life among all OPA-based disinfec [...]
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February 25, 2013 | Safety First

Atlanta, GA - Hospitals in the U.S. continue to make progress in the fight against central line-associated bloodstream infections and some surgical site infections, according to a report issued today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Catheter-associated urinary tract infections remained unchanged between 2010 and 2011. "Reductions in some of the deadliest health care-associated infections are encouraging, especially when you consider the costs to both patients and [...]
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January 31, 2013 | Safety First

Johns Hopkins to begin decontaminating isolation rooms with robotic, vapor-dispersing devices Baltimore, MD - Infection control experts at The Johns Hopkins Hospital have found that a combination of robot-like devices that disperse a bleaching agent into the air and then detoxify the disinfecting chemical are highly effective at killing and preventing the spread of multiple-drug-resistant bacteria, or so-called hospital superbugs. A study report on the use of hydrogen peroxide vaporizers -- [...]
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