July 24, 2017 |
Specialties Archives

January 10, 2017 | Specialties

London, UK — Two recent follow-up studies posted in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology have suggested that gastric bypass surgery helps severely obese teenagers lose weight and keep it off, while some patients will likely need further surgery to deal with the complications of rapid weight loss or may develop vitamin deficiencies later in life. Severe obesity is classified as having a BMI of 40 or over and affects around 4.6 million children and teenagers in the United States, causing [...]
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December 9, 2016 | Specialties

Vienna, Austria – An article published in December’s issue of Cell detailed a potential breakthrough in the study of Type 1 Diabetes and the transdifferentiation of pancreatic alpha (α) cells. Since type 1 diabetes is characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing beta (β) cells, one of the major focuses in treating the disease is the generation of new insulin-producing cells from other cell types. The group from the Center of Molecular Medicine in Vienna, led by [...]
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October 25, 2016 | Specialties

United Kingdom - An early intervention for autism aimed at helping parents communicate with their child has been shown to have an effect on reducing the severity of autism symptoms, and this reduction continued for six years after the end of treatment, according to a study published in The Lancet. The study led by the University of Manchester, King’s College London and Newcastle University (UK) is the first to identify a long-term effect of an early intervention for autism, and is consiste [...]
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May 13, 2016 | Specialties

Chapel Hill, NC – In a step forward in the push for targeted treatments that can block the specific molecular malfunctions driving cancer, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have demonstrated how a genetic mutation can drive the most common type of lymphoma as well as melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The researchers reported in Nature Medicine today the description of new laboratory models of B-cell lymphoma and melanoma featuring a [...]
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February 1, 2016 | Specialties

Durham, N.C. -- When a child comes home from preschool with a stomach bug that threatens to sideline the whole family for days, why do some members of the family get sick while others are unscathed? According to a Duke Health study published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, a person’s resistance to certain germs, specifically E. coli bacteria, could come down to their very DNA. To learn more about why some people get sick and others stay well, the researchers drew patients&rsq [...]
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November 16, 2015 | Specialties

Baltimore, MD -- Some nerve cells in the inner ear can signal tissue damage in a way similar to pain-sensing nerve cells in the body, according to new research from Johns Hopkins. If the finding, discovered in rats, is confirmed in humans, it may lead to new insights into hyperacusis, an increased sensitivity to loud noises that can lead to severe and long-lasting ear pain. “We are still a long way from being able to treat hyperacusis,” says Paul Fuchs, Ph.D., professor of otolaryng [...]
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August 21, 2015 | Specialties

Baltimore, MD - Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil have designed a DNA-loaded nanoparticle that can pass through the mucus barrier covering conducting airways of lung tissue — proving the concept, they say, that therapeutic genes may one day be delivered directly to the lungs to the levels sufficient to treat cystic fibrosis (CF), chr [...]
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July 22, 2015 | Specialties

San Diego, CA - Most of us aren’t consciously aware of our heart beat until it speeds up due to physical exertion, fear, or excitement. However, for people with a condition known as cardiac arrhythmia, the heart may suddenly start to beat too quickly, too slowly or without a regular rhythm. “Minor arrhythmias may not require treatment,” says Douglas Gibson, MD, an electrophysiologist at Scripps Clinic. “But the more serious types of arrhythmia may increase th [...]
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July 2, 2015 | Specialties

Durham, NC - Among Medicare patients who experienced a heart attack from 2007 to 2010, fewer than 1 in 10 eligible patients with low ejection fraction (a measure of how well the left ventricle of the heart pumps blood with each beat) received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) within 1 year after the heart attack, even though ICD implantation was associated with a lower risk of death at 2 years after implantation, according to a study in the June 23/30 issue of JAMA. More than [...]
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June 17, 2015 | Specialties

Mountain View, CA - El Camino Hospital in Mountain View, California has enrolled the first patient in a safety study using the RenovoCath™, a new catheter that is being introduced for targeted delivery of fluids to selected sites in the peripheral vascular system. The study will help physicians determine appropriate dosing of locally-delivered chemotherapy for patients with pancreatic cancer. "Many therapeutic agents – chemotherapy and thrombolytics, for example – have been de [...]
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May 18, 2015 | Specialties

DENVER, CO —Severe sepsis is a significant cause of rehospitalization along the lines of nationally recognized outcome measures and more commonly discussed conditions such as heart failure (HF) and pneumonia, said Darya Rudym, MD, New York University School of Medicine, New York, lead author of a study presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. Sepsis is an infection of the bloodstream that can lead to organ failure and death. “Severe sepsis continues [...]
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December 18, 2014 | Specialties

Philadelphia, PA — Frequent kidney dialysis is essential for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, but it can also cause systemic inflammation, leading to complications such as cardiovascular disease and anemia. Such inflammation can be triggered when the complement cascade, part of the body's innate immune system, is inadvertently activated by modern polymer-based dialysis blood filters. New work by Penn researchers has found an effective way to avoid these problems by temporarily supp [...]
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November 18, 2014 | Specialties

London, UK - A brief coping strategies therapy which provides stress relief and emotional support for people caring for relatives with dementia can reduce depression and anxiety and improve well-being at no extra cost to standard care, new research published in The Lancet Psychiatry suggests.  The study led by Gill Livingston, Professor of Psychiatry of Older People at University College London in the UK, found that family caregivers receiving the START (STrAtegies for RelaTives) program w [...]
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November 6, 2014 | Specialties

Findings may challenge assumption that proton therapy is more costly than other traditional treatments and supports case for insurance coverage Houston, TX - In terms of duration of treatment and cost, patients with early stage breast cancer may benefit from accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with proton therapy versus whole breast irradiation (WBI), according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center. In a cost analysis study [...]
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September 30, 2014 | Specialties

Ann Arbor, MI - Researchers at the University of Michigan have described a new approach to discovering potential cancer treatments that requires a fraction of the time needed for more traditional methods. They used the platform to identify a novel antibody that is undergoing further investigation as a potential treatment for breast, ovarian and other cancers. In research published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers in the lab of Stephen Weiss at [...]
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September 12, 2014 | Specialties

Oxford, UK - New international standards for fetal growth and newborn size provide the first accurate measurements of ideal growth and development from conception to birth. Published in The Lancet, these new standards depict a healthy pattern of growth that is desirable for all fetuses and newborns everywhere, regardless of ethnic origin.  “Healthcare practitioners already have WHO international growth standards for children from birth up to the age of 5 that are used in 140 countrie [...]
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September 3, 2014 | Specialties

Scotland, UK - Three papers published in The Lancet Psychiatry, The Lancet, and The Lancet Oncology reveal that around three-quarters of cancer patients who have major depression are not currently receiving treatment for depression, and that a new integrated treatment program is strikingly more effective at reducing depression and improving quality of life than current care.  An analysis of data from more than 21,000 patients attending cancer clinics in Scotland, UK, published in The [...]
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August 13, 2014 | Specialties

Columbus, OH - A recent study of an ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia technique, called femoral nerve block, shows that it leads to less opioid use and allows the majority of patients to go home within hours of surgery. As many as 98 percent of all pediatric knee surgeries performed at Nationwide Children’s Hospital were done in an outpatient setting, as a result of this method that reduces post-operative pain and speeds recovery. “Our goal with this technique is to reduce pain, [...]
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July 30, 2014 | Specialties

Philadelphia, PA – There is controversy over how best to treat patients after they’ve undergone surgery for prostate cancer. Does one wait until the cancer comes back or provide men with additional radiation therapy to prevent cancer recurrence? Now, a new study from Thomas Jefferson University shows that a genomic tool can help doctors and patients make a more informed decision. “We are moving away from treating everyone the same,” says first author Robert Den [...]
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July 3, 2014 | Specialties

Chicago, IL – Patients newly diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and treated with an experimental cancer vaccine made from the patient's own tumor in addition to standard of care lived longer compared to those who received standard of care alone, according to new results from a study involving Northwestern Medicine researchers.  Glioblastomas are fast growing tumors that invade normal brain tissue. The disease is often resistant to treatments such as chemotherapy and radiati [...]
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June 17, 2014 | Specialties

Columbus, OH - Heather Rayser, 16, has a colon that does not function properly and as a result, she has never been to high school, and has been on home hospital care for nine years. Her life is filled with rigidly timed and painful flushes to try to clear her colon, but a procedure recently FDA approved for use in adult cases like Heather’s is being piloted at Nationwide Children’s Hospital to give children like Heather and their families new hope. Sacral nerve stimulation, some [...]
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June 4, 2014 | Specialties

Bronx, NY – A test that counts the number of locations in tumor specimens where tumor cells may invade blood vessels predicted the risk of distant spread, or metastasis, for the most common type of breast cancer. The study was led by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI)─designated Albert Einstein Cancer Center of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care and was published online in t [...]
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May 9, 2014 | Specialties

St. Louis, MO - Thirteen-year-old Sydney Kendall had one request for the Washington University in St. Louis students building her a robotic prosthetic arm: Make it pink. Kendall Gretsch, Henry Lather and Kranti Peddada, seniors studying biomedical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, accomplished that and more. Using a 3-D printer, they created a robotic prosthetic arm out of bright-pink plastic. Total cost: $200, a fraction of the price of standard prosthetics, w [...]
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March 18, 2014 | Specialties

St. Louis, MO - A new study suggests doctors can reduce risks of brain damage after a stroke by delaying a commonly performed follow-up surgery that clears fatty deposits from an artery in the neck. Doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that the surgery, which reduces risk of additional strokes, should be delayed if patients were recently treated with the clot-busting drug tPA.  “Patients undergoing this surgery a few days after tPA tre [...]
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February 18, 2014 | Specialties

San Diego, CA — An alternative test for measuring blood flow to the brain detected a potentially dangerous hole within the heart of some patients with an unexplained stroke better than a standard test, according to late-breaking science presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2014. In addition, the transcranial Doppler test could differentiate the risk of future stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) as related to the severity of t [...]
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January 15, 2014 | Specialties

  Louisville, KY - Researchers at the University of Louisville have confirmed that using the heat profile from a person’s blood, called a plasma thermogram, can serve as an indicator for the presence or absence of cervical cancer, including the stage of cancer. The team, led by Nichola Garbett, Ph.D., published its findings online in PLOS ONE. “We have been able to demonstrate a more convenient, less intrusive test for detecting and staging cervical cancer,” Garb [...]
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January 7, 2014 | Specialties

Minneapolis, MN - Vitamin E, known for its antioxidant power, helped slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in Veterans with mild to moderate symptoms in a trial reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association. More than 600 Veterans from 14 VA medical centers around the country took part in the VA-sponsored trial. Researchers followed them for up to four years, with an average follow-up of about two years and three months. Although the disease progressed in all treatmen [...]
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December 17, 2013 | Specialties

Jamaica Plain, MA -Short-term (3 months) vs. long-term (12 months) dual anti-platelet therapy did not result in poorer outcomes on certain measures (death, heart attack, stroke, and bleeding) for patients with coronary artery disease or low-risk acute coronary syndromes (such as heart attack or unstable angina) treated with drug (zotarolimus)-releasing stents, according to a study published by JAMA. The study is being published early online to coincide with its presentation at the Transcath [...]
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December 10, 2013 | Specialties

Bethesda, MD - Men with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer who received the chemotherapy drug docetaxel given at the start of standard hormone therapy lived longer than patients who received hormone therapy alone, according to early results from a National Institutes of Health-supported randomized controlled clinical trial.  The independent Data and Safety Monitoring Committee overseeing the trial recommended to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of NIH, that the study r [...]
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November 26, 2013 | Specialties

Bethesda, MD - If you’re concerned about your cardiovascular health, you’re probably familiar with “good” and “bad” cholesterol: high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and its evil counterpart, low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Too much LDL floating around in your blood causes problems by sticking to the artery walls, narrowing the passage and raising risk of a stroke or heart attack. Statins work to lower LDL. HDL, on the other hand, cruises through your arteries scaven [...]
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November 6, 2013 | Specialties

Boston, MA - Patients with fibromyalgia showed altered brain responses to pain-related "punishment and reward" anticipatory signaling on functional MRI than healthy controls, a new study showed. New research indicates that a disruption of brain signals for reward and punishment contributes to increased pain sensitivity, known as hyperalgesia, in fibromyalgia patients. Results published in Arthritis & Rheumatism, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology, suggest that thi [...]
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October 24, 2013 | Specialties

Bethesda, MD - Cancer is a disease of the genome. It arises when genes involved in promoting or suppressing cell growth sustain mutations that disturb the normal stop and go signals.  There are more than 100 different types of cancer, most of which derive their names and current treatment based on their tissue of origin—breast, colon, or brain, for example. But because of advances in DNA sequencing and analysis, that soon may be about to change. Using data generated through The Cance [...]
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October 9, 2013 | Specialties

Tampa, Fla. – Bracing in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis reduces the likelihood that the condition will progress to the point that surgery is needed, according to a study published online in the New England Journal of Medicine. The work was supported by Shriners Hospitals for Children® and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), part of the National Institutes of Health. Scoliosis is a musculoskeletal disorder that causes an abnormal cu [...]
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September 24, 2013 | Specialties

STONY BROOK, NY – Specialists at Stony Brook University Heart Institute have launched a clinical trial investigating the first cardiovascular stent that opens a heart vessel the same way as metallic stents but then dissolves away naturally. The new stent could prove to have benefits over standard metallic drug-eluting stents in relation to vessel blood flow and how much natural motion returns to the vessel after it dissolves. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death for [...]
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September 11, 2013 | Specialties

Los Angeles, CA - Researchers at UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed a new drug delivery system using nanodiamonds (NDs) that allows for direct application of chemotherapy to brain tumors with fewer harmful side effects and better cancer-killing efficiency than existing treatments. The study was a collaboration between Dean Ho, professor, division of oral biology and medicine, division of advanced prosthodontics, and department of bioengineering and co-director of th [...]
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August 27, 2013 | Specialties

Chicago, IL – At first, Krista Easom figured the little red bump on her foot was nothing more than a blister. It didn’t hurt, but after a couple months, it didn’t go away either. She booked an appointment with a dermatologist to have it removed. She wasn’t worried. Easom, a 24-year-old law school student from New Jersey, was healthy, had no family history of cancer and was getting ready to enjoy some time in her newly adopted city of Chicago. That’s when she [...]
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August 14, 2013 | Specialties

Baltimore, MD - A study by Johns Hopkins researchers shows that a fifth of  U.S. neurologists appear unaware of serious drug safety risks associated with various anti-epilepsy drugs, potentially jeopardizing the health of patients who could be just as effectively treated with safer alternative medications. The findings suggest that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration needs a better way to communicate information to specialists about newly discovered safety risks, the researchers say, sin [...]
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July 22, 2013 | Specialties

New York, NY - A natural tissue graft can spur regeneration of cartilage and improve symptoms in patients who have cartilage damage in their knee, according to a study by researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery. The new research, the first case-series evaluation of De Novo NT Natural Tissue Graft, was presented at the annual meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM), in Chicago. “The results at this time are encouraging,” said lead author of the s [...]
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July 2, 2013 | Specialties

Royal Oak, MI - After three years of research, a multicenter, national research study led by Beaumont orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist, Joseph Guettler, M.D., may have some answers as to why youth baseball pitching injuries continue to rise despite the implementation of nationally recommended pitching limits. In fact, serious pitching injuries requiring surgery have skyrocketed with one estimate reporting serious throwing injuries are occurring 16 times more often today than jus [...]
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June 17, 2013 | Specialties

Rodchester, MN - In women at high risk for breast cancer, a long-term drug treatment can cut the risk of developing the disease in half. Researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health have now identified two gene variants that may predict which women are most likely to benefit from this therapy — and which should avoid it. The work represents a major step toward truly individualized breast cancer prevention in women at high risk for the disease based on their age, family histo [...]
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June 12, 2013 | Specialties

Findings Will Change the Way Clinicians View Endometrial Tumors   Los Angeles, CA - Progesterone, a female hormone that can be used as a therapy for endometrial cancer, eliminates tumor cells indirectly by binding to its receptor in stromal or connective tissue cells residing in the tumor microenvironment, according to a study from the G.O. Discovery Lab team and collaborators at UCLA. Like tumors of the breast and prostate, endometrial cancer is regulated by hormones. Unlike therapies f [...]
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May 9, 2013 | Specialties

Sioux Falls, SD - Patients suffering from severely clogged arteries known as coronary chronic total occlusions (CTOs) now have a minimally invasive option as opposed to the traditional open heart bypass surgery. Sanford Heart Hospital in Sioux Falls has introduced the BridgePoint chronic total occlusion system for treatment of CTOs, which prevent blood circulation to the heart.  The new technology offers a minimally invasive alternative to patients who are considered too risky for bypass o [...]
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April 9, 2013 | Specialties

New York, NY - A type of targeted immunotherapy induced remission in adults with an aggressive form of leukemia that had relapsed in 5 patients. The early results of this ongoing trial highlight the potential of the approach. When adult patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have remission followed by relapse, the prognosis is poor. Standard treatment uses chemotherapy to kill cancer cells, followed by a transplant of bone marrow stem cells to replace blood-forming cells destro [...]
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March 14, 2013 | Specialties

Columbus, OH - Following several years of study, investigators have found more evidence that viral therapy to treat solid tumors can be enhanced by blocking the body’s natural immune response. Oncolytic viruses have shown promise as anticancer agents, with variations of the herpes simplex virus (HSV) among the most commonly used. However, many studies have shown that the effectiveness of viral therapy to eradicate tumors has not been as successful with patients as it has been in the lab [...]
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March 5, 2013 | Specialties

Englewood, NJ – Patients now have access to a new fully automatic, MRI-safe pacemaker at Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, where its cardiac team became the first in the New York metro area to implant the device following approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in February. Jay Erlebacher, MD, FACC, Cardiologist at Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, performed the Medical Center’s first implant using the Medtronic Advisa DR MRI™ SureScan®, which offers [...]
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February 25, 2013 | Specialties

Rochester, MN - When M. Rizwan Sohail, M.D., entered his fellowship in infectious disease at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., nearly a decade ago, an important trend was under way. The number of patients with newly implanted pacemakers, replacement valves and other heart devices was on the rise, and the technology was saving lives. But, he quickly learned, there was also a down side. "We were seeing many cases of device infections," Dr. Sohail recalls. And because the devices were so new, [...]
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January 30, 2013 | Specialties

A majority of clinicians at Mount Sinai using electronic medical records for cancer treatment, believe the system improves patient care quality and safety. New York, NY - A majority of clinicians at The Mount Sinai Hospital using Epic's Beacon module, an electronic medical record (EMR) system designed specifically for cancer treatment, believe the system improves patient care quality and safety. The data was gathered in a survey developed by Epic and administered by Mount Sinai in November 2012 [...]
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