November 21, 2017 |
News Briefs Archives

January 10, 2017 | News Briefs

Philadelphia, PA — Six primary care practices at Temple Physicians, Inc. (TPI) have been selected to participate in a nationwide advanced primary care medical home initiative that aims to strengthen primary care through regionally-based, multi-payer payment reform and care delivery transformation. The initiative — known as Comprehensive Primary Care Plus (CPC+) — features a partnership between payer partners from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), state Me [...]
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January 10, 2017 | News Briefs

Silver Spring, MD and Haltom City, TX — The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Nurse Assist Inc. have both recently issued major recalls. The FDA has recalled all powdered surgeon’s gloves, powdered patient examination gloves and absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon’s glove to take effect on January 18th. According to the FDA, the products, “present an unreasonable and substantial risk of illness or injury and that the risk cannot be corrected or eliminated b [...]
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January 10, 2017 | News Briefs

Sacramento, CA — New York Times bestselling author and advocate John Elder Robison will speak on “Life with Autism” in a free public lecture on January 11 at the University of California – Davis' MIND Institute. Robison is the latest speaker in the ongoing 14th season of the UC Davis MIND Institute Distinguished Lecture series, which features nationally and internationally-recognized researchers, authors and advocates in areas such as autism spectrum disorder, fragile X [...]
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January 10, 2017 | News Briefs

Washington, DC — Debra L. Ness, President of the National Partnership for Women and Families recently issued a statement in response to the introduction of a budget resolution in the U.S. Senate on January 3, 2017. Her full statement can be read below:   The introduction of the budget resolution in the U.S. Senate today has started the countdown to the demise of critical health care protections we worked so hard to achieve for women and families through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) [...]
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January 10, 2017 | News Briefs

Abbott Park, IL — Abbott announced recently that it intends to close on the acquisition of St. Jude Medical, Inc. The addition of St. Jude Medical is a part of the company’s ongoing effort to develop a strong, diverse portfolio of devices, diagnostics, nutritionals and branded genetic pharmaceuticals. “We continue to deliberately shape our business for long-term success by securing leadership positions in attractive markets and focusing on customer needs,” said Miles D. [...]
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January 10, 2017 | News Briefs

Washington, DC — Four new members have been appointed to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Advisory Committee on Women Veterans, an expert panel founded in 1983 that advises VA’s Secretary on issues and programs impacting women Veterans. “VA values the transformational guidance the Committee has provided over the past 33 years, and relies on to the members to utilize their diverse perspectives in anticipating the emerging needs of women Veterans,” said Secretary of [...]
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December 14, 2016 | News Briefs

Durham, NC – Breast cancer cells that carry a certain gene mutation can be induced to die using a combination of an existing targeted therapy along with an investigational molecule tested by Duke Cancer Institute researchers. When used together in preclinical experiments, the drugs shut down two of the key survival strategies these types of cancer cells use to evade treatment.  The finding in mouse models and human tumor cells has wide implications for advancing treatment if planned [...]
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December 9, 2016 | News Briefs

London, UK — Many African HIV patients whose strains have developed resistances to older HIV medications have been shown to also have resistances to newer drugs, according to a recent University College study published in November’s Lancet. The researchers looked at 712 HIV patients worldwide whose infection was not controlled by antiretroviral drugs, finding that 16 percent of patients whose infection was resistant to modern drugs had HIV mutations linked with resistance to older H [...]
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December 9, 2016 | News Briefs

Durham, NC — Biomedical engineers at Duke University have reconfigured a popular drug-delivery technology to evade immune responses that have halted some clinical trials. Polyethylene glycol, commonly known as PEG is a polymer commonly found in commercial products from toothpaste to cosmetics, and also in pharmaceuticals. In pharmaceuticals it can be attached to drugs in the bloodstream to keep the body from clearing them, greatly lengthening the duration of their effects. Because of PEG [...]
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December 9, 2016 | News Briefs

Rootstown, OH — Researchers found a connection between reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and Alzheimer’s disease, according to an article in November’s issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. The results suggest that it may be a biomarker for the disease, presenting before significant cognitive decline. Through their research the group from Northeast Ohio Medical University found that BMD and osteoporosis occur at a much greater rate in patients with Alzheimer&rsqu [...]
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December 9, 2016 | News Briefs

Richmond, VA — Rural Appalachia is in the midst of a cancer crisis according to a University of Virginia School of Medicine study. Published in September’s issue of the Journal of Rural Health, researchers Nengliang Yao and others found that rural Appalachia is the only region in the United States to have seen an increase in cancer diagnoses from 1969 – 2011. Similarly, during that time the region catapulted from having the country’s lowest rate of cancer death to the hi [...]
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December 9, 2016 | News Briefs

Lexington, MA — iSpecimen®, a source of customized human biospecimen collections, recently announced that it has made sizeable increases to the number and types of clinical organizations participating in its partner network. As a result, the company can now offer scientists faster access to a more diverse array of human biospecimens for medical research. Initially founded as a provider of remnant clinical biospecimens, iSpecimen can additionally source biospecimens collected specific [...]
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October 25, 2016 | News Briefs

St. Paul, MN - St. Jude Medical, Inc. (NYSE:STJ), the global medical device company, announced that it will have new data featured during late-breaking clinical trial presentations at the upcoming 2016 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics educational meeting in Washington, D.C., October 29 – November 2. Throughout the congress, the company will also feature its latest cardiovascular innovations, including PressureWire™ X guidewire, the latest generation of the pioneering Pr [...]
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October 25, 2016 | News Briefs

Silver Spring, MD - HeartWare Inc. is recalling the HeartWare Ventricular Assist Device (HVAD) pumps due to a design problem with the driveline connector. The driveline is a tube that connects the HVAD's pump to the external controller and power source. Contamination of the driveline may result in fluid or other material entering the pump and causing electrical issues or pump stops that may lead to serious adverse health consequences, including death. For further info: HeartWare [...]
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October 25, 2016 | News Briefs

Achieving moderate reduction of new HIV infections among men who have sex with men (MSM) will depend on significantly increasing the percentage of HIV-infected MSM whose viral load is suppressed to undetectable levels, according to a new mathematical model based on data from Baltimore. Access and adherence to antiretroviral therapy are key to sustained HIV suppression, which dramatically reduces the risk of transmitting HIV to others. Researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sup [...]
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May 13, 2016 | News Briefs

Ascel Bio, the commercial disease forecast and outbreak warning company today announced it is dedicating its home page to providing users a free current forecast for Zika risk.  Current city-level Zika forecasts are available for over 2000 U.S. cities, and will be updated daily. Users of the site will see today's risks for their closest city displayed on a map.  A user may also search for today's risk forecast for another zip code. The forecast covers the underlying envi [...]
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May 13, 2016 | News Briefs

Ann Arbor, MI / Bristol, CT – NSF International, a global public health organization, has established the NSF International Center of Excellence for Pharmaceutical Development at its Bristol, Conn. laboratory. As an NSF International Center of Excellence, the laboratory will provide its scientific and technical expertise and expand its robust analytical testing capabilities, education and training to more clients through its laboratories in Germany, China, Peru and Brazil. The NSF Interna [...]
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May 13, 2016 | News Briefs

Vatican City – Sanford Health’s work in cellular therapy and regenerative medicine is on the world stage this week. A group of researchers and leaders from Sanford Health were selected to participate in the “Third International Conference on the Progress of Regenerative Medicine and Its Cultural Impact” and receive the 2016 Pontifical Key Innovation Award at the Vatican. The conference has gathered the world’s leading scientists, physicians, ethicists, philant [...]
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May 13, 2016 | News Briefs

Aliso Viejo, CA –  The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) hosts its annual National Teaching Institute & Critical Care Exposition, (NTI), May 16-19 in New Orleans. More than 7,000 attendees, including nurses at the forefront of research, academia, staff development and management are expected to attend this premier annual event for critical care nursing. The conference offers hundreds of sessions to improve clinical practice, patient outcomes and the hospita [...]
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February 1, 2016 | News Briefs

Nationwide Children’s Hospital is pleased to announce that its Research Building III has received LEED Gold Certification by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).LEED, or Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design, is a rigorous certification program for proving that buildings have been constructed in accordance with strict environmental principles. LEED-certified buildings improve the health and well-being of their occupants, save energy and water, and use locally sourced and recy [...]
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February 1, 2016 | News Briefs

Washington DC - Researchers report in a mouse study that they have found that central nervous system immune cells play a key role in repairing the blood-brain barrier. The blood-brain barrier prevents harmful substances in the blood from getting into the brain. If that barrier is breached, the brain becomes vulnerable to infection and injury, the researchers explained. In experiments with mice, scientists found that immune cells in the brain called microglia are crucial in repairing damage to [...]
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February 1, 2016 | News Briefs

Houston, TX – Rice University scientists have developed a tool to speed the design of molecular diagnostics that depend on the specific recognition of pathogen DNA and RNA. The Rice lab of bioengineer David Zhang introduced a method that cuts the time required to analyze the thermal behaviors of DNA and RNA strands from months to hours. The open-access method described this week in Nature Communications will help scientists build a universal database of biophysical properties of gene [...]
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November 19, 2015 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - In a randomized clinical trial of more than 300 participants, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that ranibizumab — a drug most commonly used to treat retinal swelling in people with diabetes — is an effective alternative to laser therapy for treating the most severe, potentially blinding form of diabetic retinal disease. Results of the government-sponsored study also show that the drug therapy carries fewer side effects than the currently used la [...]
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November 17, 2015 | News Briefs

Jacksonville, FL - Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have identified key differences between patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and those with the most common genetic form of ALS, a mutation in the C9orf72 gene. Their findings, reported in Nature Neuroscience, demonstrate that ALS patients show abnormalities in levels and processing of ribonucleic acids (RNA), biological molecules that determine what gene [...]
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November 5, 2015 | News Briefs

Durham, NC - Children with even mild or passing bouts of depression, anxiety and/or behavioral issues were more inclined to have serious problems that complicated their ability to lead successful lives as adults, according to research from Duke Medicine. The Duke researchers found that children who had either a diagnosed psychiatric condition or a milder form that didn’t meet the full diagnostic criteria were six times more likely than those who had no psychiatric issues to have diffi [...]
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November 2, 2015 | News Briefs

Durham, NC - A kid who is a seriously "picky eater" is also likely to struggle with emotional problems like anxiety and depression, new research suggests. About 3 percent of kids suffer from severe selective eating, to the extent that they can't eat out at a restaurant, said lead researcher Nancy Zucker, an eating disorders specialist at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C. These kids are more than twice as likely to be diagnosed with depression or social anxiety, when compared with [...]
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July 28, 2015 | News Briefs

Los Angeles, CA - Researchers at UCLA have found that a protein that serves as a suppressor of cancer diminishes in skin and mouth epithelial cells as the human body ages. Dr. No-Hee Park, dean of the UCLA School of Dentistry, and his research team have been studying p53, a tumor suppressor protein known as “the guardian of the genome” because of its involvement in DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and cellular deterioration. “Looking at ways to maintain levels of p53 [...]
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July 28, 2015 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Conventional wisdom has long blamed age-related hearing loss almost entirely on the death of sensory hair cells in the inner ear, but neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins has provided new information about the workings of nerve cells that suggests otherwise. In a paper published July 1 in The Journal of Neuroscience, the Johns Hopkins team says its studies in mice have verified an increased number of connections between certain sensory cells and nerve cells [...]
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July 7, 2015 | News Briefs

Los Angeles, CA - In the first study of its kind, UCLA and United Kingdom researchers found that neurons in a specific brain region play a key role in rapidly forming memories about every day events, a finding that may result in a better understanding of memory loss and new methods to fight it in Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases. Specifically, the study examined neurons in the medial temporal lobe associated with episodic memory, the brain's ability to consciously recall experience [...]
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July 2, 2015 | News Briefs

Durham, NC - Patients with atrial fibrillation who stopped taking blood thinners before they had elective surgery had no higher risk of developing blood clots and less risk of major bleeding compared to patients who were given a “bridge” therapy, according to research led by DCRI and Duke investigators. The findings add much-needed clarity to inconsistent practice guidelines that annually affect an estimated 250,000 patients with atrial fibrillation/flutter who take the blood thinne [...]
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June 24, 2015 | News Briefs

Boston, MA - Can a robotic teddy bear help alleviate anxiety, pain and isolation for children in a hospital? That is the hope of Dr. Peter Weinstock, the director of a training program at Boston Children’s Hospital called the Simulator Program, and Cynthia Breazeal, the director of the personal robots group at M.I.T.’s Media Lab. The two have collaborated to bring Huggable, a social robot prototype developed at the lab, into the hospital, which is financing a 90-person [...]
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June 24, 2015 | News Briefs

Cincinnati, OH - A new study links a commonly used household pesticide with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and young teens. The study found an association between pyrethroid pesticide exposure and ADHD, particularly in terms of hyperactivity and impulsivity, rather than inattentiveness. The association was stronger in boys than in girls. The study, led by researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, is published online in the journal  [...]
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June 24, 2015 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - The 50 hospitals in the United States with the highest markup of prices over their actual costs are charging out-of-network patients and the uninsured, as well as auto and workers’ compensation insurers, more than 10 times the costs allowed by Medicare, new research suggests. It’s a markup of more than 1,000 percent for the same medical services. The findings, from Gerard F. Anderson of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Ge Bai of Washingt [...]
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June 24, 2015 | News Briefs

Adelaide, Australia - Skinny jeans could leave you weak in the knees, literally. One woman was hospitalized for days after her jeans caused her to lose feeling in her legs, according to a study published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. The study said that squatting in skinny jeans can damage nerves and muscles in the legs. The 35-year-old woman had spent her day helping a relative move, squatting for hours as she emptied closets. When she was walking home [...]
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June 18, 2015 | News Briefs

Washington, DC - To further strengthen the nation’s infectious disease response capability, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has selected nine health departments and associated partner hospitals to become special regional treatment centers for patients with Ebola or other severe, highly infectious diseases. HHS’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) has awarded approximately $20 million through its Hospital Preparedness Program (HPP) [...]
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June 18, 2015 | News Briefs

Atlanta, GA - Researchers estimate that 48.5 percent of the nearly 346,000 deaths from 12 cancers among adults 35 and older in 2011 were attributable to cigarette smoking, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. Researcher Rebecca L. Siegel, M.P.H., of the American Cancer Society, Atlanta, and coauthors provide an updated estimate because they note smoking patterns and the magnitude of the association between smoking and cancer death have changed in the past d [...]
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May 15, 2015 | News Briefs

Chicago, Il - A study of survival rates in trauma patients following health insurance reform in Massachusetts found a passing increase in adjusted mortality rates, an unexpected finding suggesting that simply providing insurance incentives and subsidies may not improve survival for trauma patients, according to a report published online by JAMA Surgery. Massachusetts introduced health care reform in 2006 to expand health insurance coverage and improve outcomes. Some previous research has s [...]
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May 15, 2015 | News Briefs

Chicago, Il - "Neither individual clinicians nor families should be given unchecked authority to determine what treatments will be given to a patient," explained Douglas White, M.D., M.A.S., UPMC Chair for Ethics in Critical Care Medicine, associate professor in the University of Pittsburgh Department of Critical Care Medicine, and co-chair of the committee that produced these guidelines. "Clinicians should neither simply acquiesce to treatment requests that they believe are not in a patien [...]
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May 15, 2015 | News Briefs

Chicago, Il - Patients with chest pain who are admitted to the hospital after an emergency department evaluation with negative findings and nonconcerning vital signs rarely had adverse cardiac events, suggesting that routine inpatient admission may not be a beneficial strategy for this group of patients, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. Patients with potentially ischemic (restricted blood flow) chest pain are commonly admitted to the hospital or observed after [...]
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May 15, 2015 | News Briefs

Chicago, IL - Supplementing the plant-based Mediterranean diet with antioxidant-rich extra virgin olive oil or mixed nuts was associated with improved cognitive function in a study of older adults in Spain but the authors warn more investigation is needed, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. Emerging evidence suggests associations between dietary habits and cognitive performance. Oxidative stress (the body’s inability to appropriately detoxify itself) [...]
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May 15, 2015 | News Briefs

Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are not routinely inserted in patients with acute DVT. Typically, IVC filters  are used in patients with acute proximal DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE) who have an absolute contraindication to anticoagulant therapy (eg, recent surgery, hemorrhagic stroke, active bleeding). Although not considered absolute indications, placement of an IVC filter is also often considered as an adjunctive therapy in patients with recurrent embolism despite adequate anticoagul [...]
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May 15, 2015 | News Briefs

ALISO VIEJO, Calif. The first national study to examine the ratio of nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) to patients may help hospital administrators better determine appropriate staffing levels in acute and critical care units. Advanced practice providers such as NPs and PAs are increasingly integrated into multidisciplinary staffing models in acute and critical care units, but data about provider-to-patient ratios have been limited. Published in the May issue of [...]
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December 23, 2014 | News Briefs

New Brunswick, N.J. – Aiming to increase treatment options for prostate cancer patients who have an early relapse, investigators from a multi-institutional cooperative group – including Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey – have demonstrated that a vaccine therapy that stimulates the body’s own immune defenses can be given safely and earlier in the course of prostate cancer progression. As part of a Phase II clinical trial, adult patients with advanced prostate c [...]
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December 17, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - A study comparing low- and high-glycemic index diets found no significant difference between the two plans in reducing cardiovascular risk or reversing insulin resistance. A number of widely-followed diets have been based on the idea that focusing on foods with a low-glycemic index might improve cardiovascular risk factors and lower the risk of developing diabetes. But an NIH-funded study suggests that using the glycemic index to select foods may not improve insulin sensitivity, [...]
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December 16, 2014 | News Briefs

Schaumburg, IL - The Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH) model consistently and significantly improves quality of care for patients and reduces health care costs, reports a first-of-its-kind, large-scale literature review of the PSH in the United States and abroad. The review, published online this month in Milbank Quarterly, provides further evidence to support the benefits, and encourage the adoption, of the PSH model. “There is a global push for more rigorously coordinated and [...]
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December 12, 2014 | News Briefs

Los Angeles, CA - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new drug to treat non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), offering patients new hope in fighting this difficult disease. Lung cancer is expected to lead to over 150,000 deaths in the United States this year alone, and NSCLC accounts for about 85 percent of all lung cancers. The drug, Cyramza (ramucirumab), was tested on more than 1,200 patients with NSCLC whose cancer worsened during or after first-line chemotherapy. The [...]
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December 3, 2014 | News Briefs

St. Louis, MO - Managing childhood asthma is difficult. Rather than giving daily medications — even when children feel well — many parents treat asthma only when symptoms become severe. This practice can lead to missed school days, trips to the ER and hospitalizations. But a novel program at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that peer trainers who coach parents over the phone on managing their children’s asthma can sharply reduce the number of days [...]
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December 2, 2014 | News Briefs

Washington, DC - Vascular Solutions is looking at a January U.S. launch of its Turnpike catheters, following FDA 510(k) clearance on Nov. 25. The catheters, for use in complex coronary and peripheral procedures, will first undergo clinical testing this month, the company said Monday. The Turnpike catheters are so named because of a feature that allows them to advance through the artery when it is turned clockwise, as in “down the pike,” the Minneapolis devicemaker explains. The sing [...]
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November 25, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - In what is believed to be the first interview-style qualitative study of its kind among health care providers in the trenches, a team led by a Johns Hopkins geriatrician has further documented barriers to better care of older adults as they are transferred from hospital to rehabilitation center to home, and too often back again. Using comments and concerns drawn from in-depth interviews of 18 physicians and two home health care agency administrators — all experienced in tr [...]
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November 25, 2014 | News Briefs

Washington, DC - Anthropologists have identified concrete recommendations that would foster greater effectiveness in containing and stopping Ebola, improve international support, and pave the way for long-term stability in healthcare systems in West Africa. The report, “Strengthening West African Health Care Systems to Stop Ebola: Anthropologists Offer Insights,” will be made public during a press conference held by the American Anthropological Association (AAA), Fri., Dec. 5, 11 a. [...]
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November 24, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - After mining the genetic records of thousands of breast cancer patients, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have identified a gene whose presence may explain why some breast cancers are resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used hormone treatment generally used after surgery, radiation and other chemotherapy. The gene, called MACROD2, might also be useful in screening for some aggressive forms of breast cancers, and, someday, offering a new target for therapy, sa [...]
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November 20, 2014 | News Briefs

Palm Desert, CA – DePuy Synthes has launched a hybrid of GRYPHON® Anchors and PROKNOT™ Technology - GRYPHON PROKNOT Anchors - the first arthroscopic anchor solution for repair of shoulder and hip instability. The announcement was made at the Arthroscopy Association of North America’s (AANA) Fall Course by DePuy Synthes Mitek Sports Medicine. The GRYPHON PROKNOT Anchor combines the control, strength and consistency of traditional anchors with the low profile [...]
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November 19, 2014 | News Briefs

San Diego, CA - An antibody therapy already in clinical trials to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) may also prove effective against ovarian cancer – and likely other cancers as well, report researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine in a study published in the Nov. 17 online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The findings extend the anti-cancer potential of an experimental monoclonal antibody called [...]
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November 18, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - A new resource from the National Institutes of Health will help individuals and families understand available treatment options for alcohol problems. Developed by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), part of the NIH, Treatment for Alcohol Problems: Finding and Getting Help, covers the latest research-based treatments and what to consider when choosing among them. “The popular concept of alcohol treatment is often limited to knowledge of 28-day i [...]
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November 18, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - For HIV-infected women in good immune health, taking a three-drug regimen during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission more effectively than taking one drug during pregnancy, another during labor and two more after giving birth, an international clinical trial has found. The ongoing PROMISE (Promoting Maternal-Infant Survival Everywhere) study also has found that one triple-drug regimen for preventing mother-to-child transmission may be safer than another [...]
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November 17, 2014 | News Briefs

Silver Spring, MD - FDA is evaluating preliminary data from a clinical trial showing that treatment for 30 months with dual antiplatelet blood-thinning therapy decreased the risk of heart attacks and clot formation in stents, but there was an increased overall risk of death compared to 12 months of treatment.  The clinical trial compared 30 months versus 12 months of treatment with dual antiplatelet therapy consisting of aspirin plus either clopidogrel (Plavix) or prasugrel (Effient), [...]
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November 13, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Hospitalized premature infants are exposed to unsafe levels of a chemical found in numerous medical products used to treat them, raising questions about whether critically ill newborns may be adversely affected by equipment designed to help save their lives.The chemical, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), is used to increase flexibility of many plastic devices. These products, made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC), include most intravenous tubing, catheters, endotracheal tubes, and f [...]
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November 10, 2014 | News Briefs

St. Louis, MO - As a child, it was fascinating to put a flashlight up to our palms to see the light shine through the hand. Washington University in St. Louis engineers are using a similar idea to track movement inside the body’s tissues to improve imaging of cancerous tissues and to develop potential treatments. Lihong Wang, PhD, the Gene K. Beare Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the School of Engineering & Applied Science is applying a novel time-reversal technol [...]
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November 6, 2014 | News Briefs

Las Vegas, NV - For the treatment of peripheral artery disease in leg arteries above the knee, the IN.PACT Admiral drug-coated balloon from Medtronic provided a consistently favorable treatment effect in patients with diabetes in a landmark study of the investigational medical device, which is under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for approval. This finding comes from a pre-specified subgroup analysis of patients with diabetes in the IN.PACT SFA Trial that was present [...]
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November 6, 2014 | News Briefs

Houston, TX - Make sure you're equipped with the latest information about two pressing health care issues—view live streaming of critical updates to be delivered at the 2014 AMA Interim Meeting this weekend. Nov. 8: Improving access to care for American veterans U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert McDonald will give an update on how the nation is making sure that veterans have timely access to the health care they need. This address is scheduled to begin between 3 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. [...]
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October 31, 2014 | News Briefs

More than 43 percent of $38.3 million in diagnostic costs attributed to biopsies for patients with ultimately negative lung cancer diagnosis Chicago, IL — Biopsies were found to be the most costly tool prescribed in lung cancer diagnosis, according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology. The Symposium is sponsored by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the Internati [...]
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October 22, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - Human testing of a second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate is under way at the National Institutes of Health’s Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) are conducting the early phase trial to evaluate the vaccine, called VSV-ZEBOV, for safety and its ability to generate an immune system response in healthy adults who are given two intramuscular doses, called a prime-boost strategy. The Wal [...]
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October 20, 2014 | News Briefs

Atlanta, GA - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tightening previous infection control guidance for healthcare workers caring for patients with Ebola, to ensure there is no ambiguity.  The guidance focuses on specific personal protective equipment (PPE) health care workers should use and offers detailed step by step instructions for how to put the equipment on and take it off safely.  Recent experience from safely treating patients with Ebola at Emory University Hospita [...]
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October 15, 2014 | News Briefs

New York, NY —A team of surgeons at NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital saved the life of a one-week-old baby with the aid of a 3-D printed model of the child’s heart. The 3-D model was used as a guide for surgery on the child, who was born with a complex and deadly form of congenital heart disease (CHD). Dr. Emile Bacha, director of congenital and pediatric cardiac surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, and his team [...]
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October 9, 2014 | News Briefs

Hadley, MO - Older parents, birth defects, maternal nutrition and childhood exposure to CT scans and pesticides are increasingly being associated with brain tumors in children, according to new research from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. Brain and central nervous system tumors are the second leading cause of cancer death in children.  A team of researchers, led by Kimberly Johnson, PhD, assistant professor of social work at the Brown School, a member of th [...]
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October 7, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - Earlier today the patient who was flown back to the United States from Sierra Leone and admitted to the NIH Clinical Center on September 28 for observation, following a high-risk exposure to Ebola virus infection, was discharged to his home. The patient has given NIH permission to release the following information: The high-risk exposure was a needle stick injury. The initial hospitalization was characterized by a brief period of fever that was subsequently determined to not be re [...]
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October 3, 2014 | News Briefs

Gothenburg, SE - A 36-year-old Swedish woman has become the first in the world to give birth from a transplanted womb, after delivering a healthy baby boy weighing 3.9lbs in September, 2014.  The unidentified woman, who has a genetic condition of being born without a womb, was one of nine Swedish women who received a uterus transplant from a live donor in 2013. The transplanted womb was donated by a 61-year-old family friend, who had gone through the menopause seven years before the su [...]
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September 17, 2014 | News Briefs

Sydney, AU - Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) is more accurate than conventional CT scanning in measuring response to treatment and predicting survival in patients with follicular lymphoma, and should be used routinely in clinical practice, according to new research published in The Lancet Haematology.  “Our findings have important implications for patients with follicular lymphoma, a common and usually slow-growing lymphoma. Compared to conventional CT  [...]
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September 15, 2014 | News Briefs

St. Paul, MN - St. Jude Medical, a global medical device company, today announced a new data analysis from the CHAMPION clinical trial that evaluated outcomes in a subgroup of patients with renal dysfunction. The CHAMPION trial looked at the safety and effectiveness of the CardioMEMS™ HF System for patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III heart failure (HF) who had been hospitalized for HF in the previous 12 months. The CardioMEMS system uses a mi [...]
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September 5, 2014 | News Briefs

Physical and emotional fatigue are factors in “inadvertent” contamination   Baltimore, MD - A team of American infectious disease and critical care experts is alerting colleagues caring for Ebola patients that how they remove their personal protective gear can be just as crucial as wearing it to prevent exposure to the deadly virus. In a commentary published online in the Annals of Internal Medicine, the physician-specialists from Johns Hopkins and the University of North Car [...]
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September 1, 2014 | News Briefs

Lima, OH — Faced with a growing number of underinsured patients with escalating past due balances, many CFOs are continuing to deploy collection practices that may put patient relationships with their hospitals at risk, according to a new study of community hospital CFOs in Indiana, Michigan and Ohio. The study, commissioned by Lima, Ohio-based KeyBridge Medical Revenue Care, found that 74 percent of the CFOs surveyed say patient satisfaction with the hospital regarding billing and collec [...]
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August 26, 2014 | News Briefs

Minneapolis, MN - Medtronic, Inc. announced yesterday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved its newest cardiac resynchronization therapy-pacemaker, Viva® CRT-P, for indicated patients with heart failure or atrioventricular (AV) block. The Viva CRT-P includes the Medtronic-exclusive AdaptivCRT® algorithm, which preserves normal heart rhythms and automatically adjusts to the patient's needs, creating a customized therapy for each patient. It is the only algori [...]
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August 25, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - A genetic variation linked to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression wreaks havoc on connections among neurons in the developing brain, a team of researchers reports. The study, led by Guo-li Ming, M.D., Ph.D., and Hongjun Song, Ph.D., of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and described online Aug. 17 in the journal Nature, used stem cells generated from people with and without mental illness to observe the effects of a rare an [...]
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August 25, 2014 | News Briefs

Nation’s Leading Experts Produce Tool for Hospitals, Health Systems, Policymakers to Help End Practice That is Linked to Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality Washington, DC — Greater awareness among parents and providers of the dangers of choosing to have babies before they are full term has decreased the practice in the United States, but in some areas of the country, early elective deliveries (EEDs) still occur too frequently. A phenomenon of the last 20 years, EED is defined as deliv [...]
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August 25, 2014 | News Briefs

Durham, NC – Implantating deep brain stimulation devices poses no greater risk of complications to older patients than it does to younger patients with Parkinson’s disease, researchers at Duke Medicine report. The findings, published today in the journal JAMA Neurology, ease concerns that patients older than age 75 are poorer candidates for deep brain stimulation (DBS) because they may be prone to bleeding, infections or other complications that can arise after surgeries.  &ld [...]
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August 21, 2014 | News Briefs

San Francisco, CA - A newborn screening test for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) reliably identifies infants with this life-threatening inherited condition, leading to prompt treatment and high survival rates, according to a study supported by the National Institutes of Health. Researchers led by Jennifer Puck, M.D., of the University of California, San Francisco, also found that SCID affects approximately 1 in 58,000 newborns, indicating that the disorder is less rare than previous [...]
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August 20, 2014 | News Briefs

Los Angeles, CA - Providing futile treatment in the intensive care unit sets off a chain reaction that causes other ill patients needing medical attention to wait for critical care beds, according to a study by researchers from UCLA and RAND Health. The study is the first to show that when unbeneficial medical care is provided, others who might be able to benefit from treatment are harmed, said study lead author Dr. Thanh Huynh, an assistant professor of medicine in the division of pulmonary an [...]
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August 13, 2014 | News Briefs

Little Rock, AK — A new device developed by a physician at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) and a researcher at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) could soon be available to treat stroke more effectively. The ClotBust ER® fits on the head like a halo and delivers therapy to quickly bust clots that cause stroke. It was developed by William Culp, M.D., professor of radiology, surgery and neurology and vice chairman of research at UAMS, and [...]
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August 13, 2014 | News Briefs

Durham, NC – Normal microorganisms in the intestines appear to play a pivotal role in how the HIV virus foils a successful attack from the body’s immune system, according to new research from Duke Medicine. The study, published today, in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, builds on previous work from researchers at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute that outlined a perplexing quality about HIV: The antibodies that originally arise to fight the virus are ineffective. These initial, [...]
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August 12, 2014 | News Briefs

Washington, DC - Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the XVIVO Perfusion System (XPS) with STEEN Solution, a device for preserving donated lungs that do not initially meet the standard criteria for lung transplantation but may be transplantable if there is more time to observe and evaluate the organ’s function to determine whether the lung is viable for transplantation. Approximately one in five donated lungs meets the standard criteria for a donor lung and is transplant [...]
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August 11, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - A nasal brush test can rapidly and accurately diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), an incurable and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder, according to a study by National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and their Italian colleagues. Up to now, a definitive CJD diagnosis required testing brain tissue obtained after death or by biopsy in living patients. The study describing the less invasive nasal test appears in the New England Journal of Medicine. CJD is a [...]
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August 11, 2014 | News Briefs

Oxford, UK - Many more stroke patients could benefit from thrombolytic treatment but it needs to be administered as quickly as possible after the first signs of illness, according to new findings from the largest meta-analysis to date investigating the clot-busting drug alteplase. The study, which involved more than 6700 stroke patients, is published in The Lancet. The emergency treatment with alteplase markedly improves the chances of a good outcome when administered within 4·5 hou [...]
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August 8, 2014 | News Briefs

London, UK - Screening for prostate cancer could reduce deaths from the disease by about a fifth, according to the long-term results of a major European study involving over 162 000 men published in The Lancet. Despite this new evidence for the effectiveness of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing to reduce mortality, doubts as to whether the benefits of screening outweigh the harms remain, and routine PSA screening programmes should not be introduced at this time, conclude the authors. The [...]
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August 5, 2014 | News Briefs

St. Paul, MN - St. Jude Medical, Inc. today announced that the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has approved a New Technology Add-on Payment (NTAP) for the CardioMEMS™ HF System. The CardioMEMS HF System is the first and only U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved heart failure (HF) monitoring device that has been proven to significantly reduce hospital admissions when used by physicians to manage heart failure. The NTAP program, which [...]
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August 4, 2014 | News Briefs

Atlanta, GA - Healthcare providers should be alert for and evaluate suspected patients for Ebola virus infection who have both consistent symptoms and risk factors as follows: 1) Clinical criteria, which includes fever of greater than 38.6 degrees Celsius or 101.5 degrees Fahrenheit, and additional symptoms such as severe headache, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, or unexplained hemorrhage; AND 2) Epidemiologic risk factors within the past 3 weeks before the onset of symptoms, su [...]
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August 4, 2014 | News Briefs

Chicago, IL – A new study, published in the July, 2014, issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute by Northwestern Medicine® researchers, sheds new light on the risks associated with the growing popularity of endoscopic resection in the treatment of localized, early-stage esophageal cancer. Researchers found that the more traditional surgical resection, while more invasive, provided significantly better outcomes with an 87.6 percent five-year survival rate for patients [...]
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August 4, 2014 | News Briefs

AURORA, Colo. – July 24, 2014 – American Sentinel University’s free e-book, ‘Are You Prepared to Identify and Prevent the Three Infections That Make Up Two-Thirds of All Healthcare Associated Infections?’ is a go-to guide to help nurses minimize the occurrence of hospital-acquired infection (HAI) risk factors and details basic prevention measures that every nurse should know to help prevent infections. The e-book is available to be downloaded for free here. “ [...]
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August 1, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Physicians at Johns Hopkins have developed blood and saliva tests that help accurately predict recurrences of HPV-linked oral cancers in a substantial number of patients. The tests screen for DNA fragments of the human papillomavirus (HPV) shed from cancer cells lingering in the mouth or other parts of the body. A description of the development is published in the July 31 issue of JAMA Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery. “There is a window of opportunity in the [...]
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July 31, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - Early transplantation of blood-forming stem cells is a highly effective treatment for infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a group of rare, life-threatening inherited immune system disorders, a study funded by the National Institutes of Health suggests. Approximately three-quarters of SCID infants who received transplants survived for at least five years. Infants who received transplants within the first 3.5 months of life had the best outcomes. Researchers from [...]
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July 30, 2014 | News Briefs

Gainesville, FL — Patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia complain of chronic pain throughout their bodies, but often doctors have difficulty detecting what causes the pain, and therefore, how to treat it. These patients also complain of hyperalgesia, or increased sensitivity to pain. A University of Florida study published in the July issue of the European Journal of Pain has found that injections of the painkiller lidocaine in peripheral tissues such as muscles in the shoulders or buttocks [...]
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July 15, 2014 | News Briefs

Gainesville, FL — A University of Florida study has found that the regular use of some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, increases the risk of stroke, heart attack and death in postmenopausal women. The study was published this week in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. The researchers found that regular use of the NSAID naproxen, the active ingredient in medications such as Aleve, is associated with a 10 percent increased risk of heart attack, s [...]
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July 14, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Strong leadership, reliable health care coordination and first-rate information technology are key for academic medical centers seeking to establish successful accountable care organizations, according to a Johns Hopkins study published in the journal Academic Medicine. Led by Scott Berkowitz, medical director for accountable care for Johns Hopkins Medicine and assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the study looked at the nation’s first 25 [...]
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July 11, 2014 | News Briefs

Hershey, PA - The drug letrozole results in higher birth rates in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) than the long standing current preferred infertility treatment drug, clomiphene citrate, according to a nationwide study led by Penn State College of Medicine researchers. “Clomiphene has its drawbacks,” said Dr. Richard Legro, professor of obstetrics and gynecology and lead author on the study. “It’s only 22 percent successful with up to six [...]
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July 10, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Physicians at Johns Hopkins have developed blood and saliva tests that help accurately predict recurrences of HPV-linked oral cancers in a substantial number of patients. The tests screen for DNA fragments of the human papillomavirus (HPV) shed from cancer cells lingering in the mouth or other parts of the body. A description of the development is published in the July 9 issue of JAMA Otolaryngology. “There is a window of opportunity in the year after initial therapy to ta [...]
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July 10, 2014 | News Briefs

Seattle, WA – Mitek Sports Medicine, a leader in orthopaedics sports medicine and a part of the DePuy Synthes Companies of Johnson & Johnson, announced the launch of MONOVISC® High Molecular Weight Hyaluronan, a single-injection treatment for knee pain related to osteoarthritis and the PEAK™ Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) System, a new device that produces high quality PRP in only 2.5 minutes.[1] The announcement was made here at the Ameri [...]
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July 9, 2014 | News Briefs

Buffalo, NY - Looking for better ways to assess the proficiency of surgeons performing robot-assisted surgeries, researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) and the University at Buffalo (UB) determined whether cognitive assessment can effectively measure the expertise of robotic surgeons with varying levels of experience. They found that assessment of robotic surgeons’ cognitive processes during surgery gives a fuller, more reliable picture than other measurable indicators, a [...]
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July 8, 2014 | News Briefs

Buffalo, NY - Researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) have identified a mechanism of breast cancer cells that leads to chemotherapy resistance in inflammatory breast cancer. These preclinical findings, published online ahead of print in the International Journal of Oncology, provide evidence for a potential therapeutic approach that will restore sensitivity to chemotherapy and improve treatment of inflammatory breast cancer tumors. “This study forms the basis for future resear [...]
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July 7, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD — A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer can be devastating due in part to aggressive cell replication, tumor growth, quick progression and a low five-year survival rate (less than 5 percent). GRP78, a protein that protects cells from dying, is more abundant in cancer cells and tissue than in normal organs and is thought to play a role in helping pancreatic cancer cells survive and thrive. Researchers at the University of Minnesota have found triptolide, an extract of the Chinese h [...]
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July 7, 2014 | News Briefs

Chapel Hill, NC – For the first time, scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have shown that eliminating the enzyme factor XIII reduces the number of red blood cells trapped in a clot, resulting in a 50 percent reduction in the size of the clot. The finding, featured in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, has major implications for people at high risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a condition that – together with its deadly cousin pulmonary embolism – affects 300,00 [...]
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July 5, 2014 | News Briefs

Chicago, IL - Women with early-stage breast cancer may now receive a one-dose radiation treatment at the same time as lumpectomy surgery, eliminating the need to return to the hospital daily for up to six weeks for post surgical radiation treatments. The relatively new treatment option available at the Rush Comprehensive Breast Cancer Clinic, intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), delivers one precise, concentrated dose of radiation to the tumor site immediately following surgical removal of [...]
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July 3, 2014 | News Briefs

Caen, FR - Insulin pumps are significantly more effective at controlling blood glucose in people with type 2 diabetes who have failed to respond to the usual standard of care, multiple daily insulin injections, according to the largest international study to examine the safety and effectiveness of the pumps to treat type 2 diabetes, published in The Lancet.  Roughly a third of these patients in need of insulin therapy struggle to achieve the right level of blood sugar control with insulin [...]
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July 1, 2014 | News Briefs

Valencia, CA - MannKind Corporation announced that the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has approved AFREZZA® (insulin human) Inhalation Powder to improve glycemic control in adult patients with diabetes mellitus. "Approval of AFREZZA is an important milestone for MannKind, as the FDA's action validates the years of clinical research and commitment that powered the development of this unique therapy," said Alfred Mann, Chief Executive Officer, MannKind [...]
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July 1, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - Emotional and behavioral problems show up even with low exposure to lead, and as blood lead levels increase in children, so do the problems, according to research funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. The results were published online yesterday 30 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. “This research focused on lower blood lead levels than most other studies and adds more evidence that there is no sa [...]
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June 30, 2014 | News Briefs

Philadelphia, PA – A new investigational drug that could be a game changer in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is being offered to patients at Temple Lung Center as part of a limited “expanded access” program in advance of the drug’s regulatory approval.  Results of a recently published phase III trial showed that the drug, pirfenidone, slowed disease progression in patients with IPF, a debilitating and deadly lung condition. The need for ne [...]
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June 25, 2014 | News Briefs

Gosselies, BE – Bone Therapeutics, a regenerative therapy company addressing unmet medical needs in the field of bone diseases and orthopedics, today announces that the first patient has been treated with its novel allogeneic osteoblastic (bone-forming) cell therapy product ALLOB® in its phase I/IIa study for the treatment of delayed union fractures. ALLOB is the first ever allogeneic differentiated[1] osteoblastic cell therapy product developed for the treatment o [...]
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June 25, 2014 | News Briefs

Albuquerque, NM - More and more people are surviving their cancer but unfortunately survival can come with pain. Although many people won’t feel any pain after their cancer treatment, some may have chronic, bothersome pain. The persistantly troubling pain reminds them of their cancer every time they perform an everyday task. In a very few cases, pain can be so severe that it keeps people from enjoying the life they fought so hard to preserve. Fortunately, cancer survivors in pain can [...]
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June 25, 2014 | News Briefs

New Brunswick, NJ – According to the National Cancer Institute, more than a third of all human cancers, including a high percentage of pancreas, lung and colon cancers are driven by mutations in a family of genes known as Ras. Ras has long been considered to be a target that does not respond to cancer treating drugs, but recent research suggests new possibilities. Investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey have demonstrated that targeting a metabolic dependency downstream [...]
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June 17, 2014 | News Briefs

Irvine, CA - Edwards Lifesciences, a global leader in the science of heart valves and hemodynamic monitoring, today announced that it has received FDA approval for its Edwards SAPIEN XT transcatheter aortic heart valve for the treatment of high-risk and inoperable patients suffering from severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). This next-generation, lower-profile system, which includes the 29mm valve size for patients with a large native annulus, will allow for the treatment of more patient [...]
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June 17, 2014 | News Briefs

First-ever Platform to Deliver Highly Accurate, Molecular Results in Under 15 Minutes Waltham, MA - Alere said Monday that it has received FDA 510(k) clearance for the Alere I Influenza A and B test, the first and only molecular test to detect and distinguish those viruses in less than 15 minutes. The test involves the extraction and analysis of DNA or RNA strands to detect sequences that are associated with viral and bacterial causes of infections, the company said. The user-friendly platfo [...]
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June 16, 2014 | News Briefs

Chicago, IL - “You have Type 2 diabetes.” When you deliver this news to patients, many are surprised, even shocked. Research shows some are so busy processing this unwelcome information, they have a difficult time focusing on what you are saying – and about a fourth of them wonder whether it’s even true. And yet you have a short time to ensure they understand just how serious the disease is and what needs to be done in order to remain as healthy as possible. It’s n [...]
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June 9, 2014 | News Briefs

Dublin, IE - Covidien plc announced the European commercial launch of its Nellcor™ Respiration Rate System. In addition to the Adult Respiratory Sensor, the system includes the Nellcor™ Respiration Rate Version 2.0 software and Nellcor™ Bedside Respiratory Patient Monitoring System, PM1000N, both of which recently received CE Mark approval. With this addition to the Nellcor™ Respiratory Function portfolio – a single-sensor, pleth-based respiration rate mo [...]
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June 6, 2014 | News Briefs

Irving, TX- Caris Life Sciences® and investigators from Inova Fairfax Hospital presented the first clinical outcomes data presentation from the Caris Registry™ at the 50th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). This data, focusing on patients with ovarian cancer, demonstrated significant improvement in survival in women with ovarian cancer.  “We have long hypothesized that personalizing ovarian cancer therapy selection through tumor profiling wo [...]
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June 5, 2014 | News Briefs

Durham, NC - Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are associated with improved survival among heart failure patients whose left ventricles only pump 30 to 35 percent of blood out of the heart with each contraction, according to a study from the Duke Clinical Research Institute. The findings, published yesterday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, support existing recommendations to implant ICDs in patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 35 perc [...]
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June 4, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD ― At least 10 percent of people who have a heart attack may have undiagnosed diabetes, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2014. Researchers studied data on 2,854 heart attack patients who did not have a known diagnosis of diabetes in 24 U.S. hospitals to understand the prevalence and recognition of undiagnosed diabetes. They tested the patients’ A1C levels -&n [...]
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June 4, 2014 | News Briefs

Cooper City, FL - SafeWire, LLC, a medical device company focused on the design and development of devices for minimally invasive spine surgery, announced that it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its Y-Wire® 2 orthopaedic guidewire with additional claims.  The Y-Wire 2 is a patented orthopedic guidewire with a distinctive split tip that is designed to prevent inadvertent advancement of the wire through bone. Upon exiting its [...]
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June 4, 2014 | News Briefs

Los Angeles, CA - A team of UCLA researchers has identified a new gene involved in Parkinson’s disease, a finding that may one day provide a target for a new drug to prevent and potentially even cure the debilitating neurological disorder.  A handful of genes have been identified in inherited cases of Parkinson’s disease. Guo’s team was one of two groups worldwide that first reported in 2006 in the journal Nature that two of these genes, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PI [...]
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June 3, 2014 | News Briefs

Stanford, CA - Most physicians would choose a do-not-resuscitate or “no code” status for themselves when they are terminally ill, yet they tend to pursue aggressive, life-prolonging treatment for patients facing the same prognosis, according to a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. It’s a disconnect that needs to be better understood, said VJ Periyakoil, MD, clinical associate professor of medicine and lead author of the study, which was published [...]
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June 2, 2014 | News Briefs

Little Falls, NJ - Cantel Medical Corp. and OsteoSymbionics, a leading designer and manufacturer of innovative, patient-specific craniofacial implants, are pleased to announce FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) 510(k) clearance of OsteoSymbionics' signature ClearShield™ product made from Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). ClearShield™ is the first Class II medical device cleared by the FDA utilizing REVOX® Sterilization Solutions' room temperature peracetic acid/ [...]
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May 29, 2014 | News Briefs

London, UK - Raised systolic and diastolic blood pressures may have different effects on different types of cardiovascular diseases and at different ages, according to new research involving 1.25 million patients from primary care practices in England published in a special themed issue of The Lancet.  The issue is published ahead of Hypertension 2014, the Joint Meeting of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and International Society of Hypertension (ISH), to be held in Athens, Greec [...]
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May 28, 2014 | News Briefs

In a finding that runs counter to most health disparities research, Johns Hopkins researchers say that while younger black trauma patients are significantly more likely than whites to die from their injuries, black trauma patients over the age of 65 are 20 percent less likely to do so. A report on the research appears online May 28 in JAMA Surgery. “We have long found it vexing that minority patients consistently do worse, even in treatment for trauma that seems to leave little [...]
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May 22, 2014 | News Briefs

Bottom Line: Children who receive cochlear implants (CI) to help alleviate severe to profound hearing loss are at greater risk of having deficiencies in executive functioning (EF), which are the skills to organize, control and process information in a goal-directed manner.  Author: William G. Kronenberger, Ph.D., of the Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, and colleagues.  Background: Permanent hearing loss is a common condition of early childhood, occurring in about [...]
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May 22, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - A drug used to treat patients with mild to moderate lung damage from the disease idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is no better than placebo for preserving lung function, according to a study supported by the National Institutes of Health. The finding is in the final report of a clinical trial called Prednisone, Azathioprine, and N-Acetylcysteine: A Study That Evaluates Response in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (PANTHER-IPF). It will be published tomorrow in the New England Jou [...]
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May 21, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Johns Hopkins researchers say they have developed a technique that can predict — with 95 percent accuracy — which stroke victims will benefit from intravenous, clot-busting drugs and which will suffer dangerous and potentially lethal bleeding in the brain. Reporting online May 15 in the journal Stroke, the Johns Hopkins team says these predictions were made possible by applying a new method they developed that uses standard MRI scans to measures damage to the blood-b [...]
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May 21, 2014 | News Briefs

Linthicum, MD — The American Urological Association (AUA) recently released its first evidence-based clinical guideline to improve the evaluation, treatment and follow-up of first-time and recurrent kidney stone formers. Kidney stone disease can be asymptomatic and occur intermittently and repeatedly. For those who have experienced a stone or undergone surgical intervention for a stone, there is strong motivation to avoid a repeat episode. Consequently, these patients often seek advi [...]
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May 20, 2014 | News Briefs

Carlsbad, CA, May 20, 2014: Rose Medical Systems, Inc. is launching their patented “Instant Voice System” at this year’s AACN meeting being held in Denver, Colorado from May 20th through May 22nd. The National Teaching Institute & Critical Care Exposition (NTI) is the premier conference for high acuity and critical care nurses. Instant Voice is the first technology that allows “Temporarily” speech disabled patients the ability to fully communicate their physica [...]
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May 20, 2014 | News Briefs

Atlanta, GA - Ongoing investigation of the first imported case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in the United States has identified evidence of apparent past MERS-CoV infection in an Illinois man who had close contact with the Indiana MERS patient.  The Illinois resident did not seek or require medical care. However, local health officials have monitored his health daily since May 3 as part of the investigation. At this time, the Illinois resident is repo [...]
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May 19, 2014 | News Briefs

Atlanta, GA - Healthcare professionals should evaluate for MERS-CoV infection, patients in the U.S. who meet the following criteria: Fever and pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (based on clinical or radiologic evidence) AND EITHER: history of travel from countries in or near the Arabian Peninsula within 14 days before symptom onset OR close contact2 with a symptomatic traveler who developed fever and acute respiratory illness (not necessarily pneumonia) within [...]
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May 14, 2014 | News Briefs

Los Angeles, CA - Treating older men with early-stage prostate cancer who also have other serious underlying health problems with aggressive therapies such as surgery or radiation therapy does not help them live longer and, in fact, can be detrimental, according to a study by UCLA researchers. The study followed the cases of more than 140,500 men aged 66 and older diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer between 1991 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Medicare [...]
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May 14, 2014 | News Briefs

Sioux Falls, S.D. – Sanford Women’s is now performing single-incision robotic hysterectomies.  The surgery is performed through a tiny incision in the belly button, making the procedure virtually scarless. The instrumentation allows the surgeon to remove the uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries through one small incision. In addition to a minimal scar that is often hidden by the belly button, the benefits of this surgical procedure may include shorter hospital stay, faster [...]
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May 13, 2014 | News Briefs

St. Paul, MN - St. Jude Medical, a global medical device company, today announced that the first patient implants occurred in the Portico™ Re-sheathable Transcatheter Aortic Valve System U.S. IDE Trial (PORTICO trial). The trial is evaluating the Portico™ Transcatheter Aortic Valve System, the first aortic heart valve that is repositionable until fully deployed. The trial will enroll patients who are considered to have a high or an extreme surgical risk (meaning they w [...]
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May 13, 2014 | News Briefs

London, UK - With spinal fusion surgeries receiving extensive scrutiny from various facets of the US medical community, the number of procedures performed will be hindered mainly by reimbursement changes, says an analyst with research and consulting firm GlobalData. Joseph Gregory, GlobalData’s Analyst covering Surgical Devices, states that everyone, from health insurers and hospital management to spine surgeons and policy makers, has expressed concerns that the increasing procedure volum [...]
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May 9, 2014 | News Briefs

Boston, MA - Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have identified the mechanism by which an enzyme produced in the intestinal lining helps to maintain a healthy population of gastrointestinal microbes. In their report in American Journal of Physiology – Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, the research team describes finding that intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria by blocking the growth-inhibiting action of adenosine t [...]
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May 5, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - Combining the estrogen hormone estriol with Copaxone, a drug indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), may improve symptoms in patients with the disorder, according to preliminary results from a clinical study of 158 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The findings were presented by Rhonda Voskuhl, M.D., from the University of California, Los Angeles, at the American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting in Phi [...]
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May 1, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - A type of cell that builds mouse hearts can renew itself, Johns Hopkins researchers report. According to the research team, the discovery, which likely applies to such cells in humans as well, may pave the way to using them to repair hearts damaged by disease — or even grow new heart tissue for transplantation. In a study to be published in the journal eLife, the scientists also found that during heart formation, the cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) multiply without becomin [...]
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April 30, 2014 | News Briefs

JAMA Dermatology Study Highlight Bottom Line: Using higher-wattage ultra violet (UV) lamps at nail salons to dry and cure polish was associated with more UV-A radiation being emitted, but the brief exposure after a manicure would require multiple visits for potential DNA damage and the risk for cancer remains small. Author: Lyndsay R. Shipp, M.D., of Georgia Regents University, Augusta, and colleagues. Background: The use of lamps that emit UV radiation in nail salons has [...]
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April 25, 2014 | News Briefs

RED LODGE, MT -  One of the biggest challenges American hospitals face right now is adopting electronic medical records systems. It’s costing tens of billions of dollars, eating up tons of staff time and it's especially tough for the country's 2,000 rural and small town hospitals. Rural hospitals are typically cash strapped, and people with information technology skills can be hard to find outside of big cities.That means a lot of small hospitals are turning to bigger hospitals for h [...]
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April 25, 2014 | News Briefs

Silver Spring, MD - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing a long-awaited new rule that would extend its authority to regulate all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. The new proposal would extend the FDA's basic authority to all other tobacco products beyond what it already regulates on the basis of the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. Currently, unregulated tobacco products include not only e-cigarettes but large and small cigars, as well as hoo [...]
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April 23, 2014 | News Briefs

Chicago, Il - Since mid-January, the nurses at the Coastal Cancer Center in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, have been spending several hours each week tracking down suppliers who can provide the intravenous (IV) solutions necessary for patients scheduled to receive chemotherapy. If they are unsuccessful, Vijay Paudel, MD, an oncologist at the facility, is faced with the onerous decision of which patients will get their treatments and who will have to wait. “The bottom line is that patients [...]
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April 9, 2014 | News Briefs

Chapel Hill, NC – Researchers at UNC School of Medicine have pinpointed a viral protein that plays a major role in making respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) the most common cause of hospitalization in children under one year of age. The discovery, published April 8 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, is the first step toward identifying better diagnostics and potential treatments for an infection that strikes nearly all children before they reach the age of three and causing severe d [...]
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April 9, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Analyzing a national database of hospital inpatient records, a team of researchers reports an expected spike in mortality six days after cardiac surgery, but also a more surprising and potentially troubling jump in deaths at the 30-day mark. In a report on the study, they suggest that while there could be “organic” medical reasons for the extra deaths, the more likely explanation may be an unintended consequence of putting so much emphasis on marking one-month &ldquo [...]
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April 3, 2014 | News Briefs

Sydney, AU - Results of a new trial of treatments for chronic whiplash pain, published in The Lancet, suggest that expensive, intense physiotherapy sessions do not show any additional benefit over a single physiotherapy session of education and advice with phone follow-up. The findings are in line with previous studies on the subject, which have reported minimal additional benefit of longer physiotherapy programs over briefer physiotherapy programs for acute whiplash-associated disorders. The c [...]
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April 2, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - A daily low dose of aspirin does not appear to prevent subsequent pregnancy loss among women with a history of one or two prior pregnancy losses, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health. However, in a smaller group of women who had experienced a single recent pregnancy loss, aspirin increased the likelihood of becoming pregnant and having a live birth. Many health care providers prescribe low dose aspirin therapy for women who have had a pregnancy loss (mis [...]
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April 2, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Patients have substantial physical impairments even two years after being discharged from the hospital after a stay in an intensive care unit (ICU), new Johns Hopkins research suggests. The scientists found that for every day of bed rest in the ICU, muscle strength was between 3 and 11 percent lower over the following months and years. “Even a single day of bed rest in the ICU has a lasting impact on weakness, which impacts patients’ physical functioning and qua [...]
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April 1, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Johns Hopkins researchers have devised a computerized process that could make minimally invasive surgery more accurate and streamlined using equipment already common in the operating room. In a report published recently in the journal Physics in Medicine and Biology, the researchers say initial testing of the algorithm shows that their image-based guidance system is potentially superior to conventional tracking systems that have been the mainstay of surgical navigation over the [...]
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April 1, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - In a report published in the April edition of the Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques, a Johns Hopkins team says that only 10 percent of orthopaedic surgeons and neurosurgeons follow professional guidelines recommending routine psychological screenings of patients prior to major surgery for severe back and leg pain. The oversight, researchers say, may pose a serious risk to patients’ surgical recovery. Previous reports have tied bouts of depression to longer recuper [...]
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March 31, 2014 | News Briefs

Adelaide, AU - Researchers at the University of Adelaide have discovered that a commonly used anesthetic technique to reduce the blood pressure of patients undergoing surgery could increase the risk of starving the brain of oxygen. Reducing blood pressure is important in a wide range of surgeries and is especially useful for improving visibility for surgeons, by helping to remove excess blood from the site being operated on. Of the many different techniques used to lower patients' blo [...]
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March 28, 2014 | News Briefs

Dallas, TX - Suffering a severe burn is a traumatic experience. For those who survive, their wounds are slow to heal, excruciatingly painful and susceptible to infection. To make matters worse, hospitalized burn patients have to endure additional intense pain and distress during wound care. Studies have shown that painful daily wound care procedures are particularly traumatic for pediatric burn patients and can interrupt and delay wound healing. Fortunately, for some patients this traditional t [...]
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March 26, 2014 | News Briefs

Portland, OR - An Oregon Health & Science University scientist has been able to make embryonic stem cells from adult mouse body cells using the cytoplasm of two-cell embryos that were in the "interphase" stage of the cell cycle. Scientists had previously thought the interphase stage — a later stage of the cell cycle — was incapable of converting transplanted adult cell nuclei into embryonic stem cells. The findings by OHSU's Shoukhrat Mitalipov, Ph.D., and his team could have ma [...]
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March 26, 2014 | News Briefs

Chapel Hill, N.C. – Neurologists have long debated how to help prevent certain stroke patients from suffering a second stroke. Now research from UNC School of Medicine provides the first evidence for which course of treatment is truly best for patients with poor collateral blood vessel formation near the site of stroke: they should have their blood pressure lowered to normal levels. Many neurologists had suspected that blood pressure should be left high in this group of patients because d [...]
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March 25, 2014 | News Briefs

San Diego, CA - Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center report that bariatric surgery resulting in dramatic weight loss in formerly severely obese women reduces the risk of endometrial cancer by 71 percent and as much as 81 percent if normal weight is maintained after surgery. Published in the April issue of Gynecologic Oncology, the official publication of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology, the findings indicate obesity may be a [...]
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March 20, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Expanding on earlier research, Johns Hopkins researchers report that people with balance disorders or dizziness traceable to an inner-ear disturbance show distinctive abnormal eye movements when the affected ear is exposed to the strong pull of an MRI’s magnetic field. The researchers first reported in 2011 in the journal Current Biology that an MRI’s magnetic field pushes on the inner ear fluid responsible for maintaining balance, causing subjects undergoing MRI sca [...]
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March 19, 2014 | News Briefs

London, UK - Results of a phase 2 study published in The Lancet suggest that simvastatin, a cheap cholesterol lowering drug, might be a potential treatment option for the secondary progressive, or chronic, stage of multiple sclerosis (MS), which is currently untreatable. Findings from the MS-STAT trial showed that a high, daily dose of simvastatin was safe, well tolerated, and slowed brain atrophy (shrinkage) by 43% over two years compared with placebo. Longitudinal studies suggest that atrophy [...]
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March 19, 2014 | News Briefs

Nottingham, UK - Adults hospitalised with H1N1 influenza during the 2009–2010 pandemic were 25% less likely to die from the disease if they were given antiviral drugs called neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) such as Tamiflu®, according to a large meta-analysis involving more than 29 000 patients from 38 countries, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal.  The findings also indicate that treatment within 2 days of flu symptoms developing halved the risk of death compared [...]
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March 18, 2014 | News Briefs

Montréal, CA - The Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) at the Université de Montréal (UdeM), in collaboration with the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital’s Quebec Leukemia Cell Bank, recently achieved a significant breakthrough thanks to the laboratory growth of leukemic stem cells, which will speed up the development of new cancer drugs. In a recent study published in Nature Methods, the scientists involved describe how they succeeded in ident [...]
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March 17, 2014 | News Briefs

Royal Oak, MI - Research by Beaumont Health System radiation oncologists and neurosurgeons found that symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia, or TN, a nerve disorder causing severe facial pain, were reduced in those treated with Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery. The results were published in the February issue of the journal Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery. TN is a disorder of the trigeminal nerve, which is responsible for feeling in the face. In most cases, the facial pain is caused by [...]
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March 13, 2014 | News Briefs

PHOTO: Normal epithelial cells (red) in this fragment of a mouse mammary duct form branched structures. However, cells that turn on the gene Twist1 (green) detach from neighboring cells and migrate into the surrounding environment. Credit: Eliah Shamir Baltimore, MD - Studying epithelial cells, the cell type that most commonly turns cancerous, Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a protein that causes cells to release from their neighbors and migrate awa [...]
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March 11, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - Two surgical treatments for a form of pelvic hernia affecting women have similar rates of success and safety, scientists in a National Institutes of Health research network have found. A guided exercise therapy to strengthen pelvic muscles did not add to the benefits of either surgery. PHOTO: Pelvic organ prolapse. Images depict the pelvic cavity, some time after surgery to remove the uterus. At left, from left to right, the bladder, vagina, and rectum as they would normally [...]
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March 7, 2014 | News Briefs

New York, NY - Approximately one in five U.S. health facilities doesn't make alcohol-based hand sanitizer available at every point of care, missing a critical opportunity to prevent health care-associated infections, according to new research from Columbia University School of Nursing and the World Health Organization (WHO) published in the American Journal of Infection Control. The study, which examined compliance with WHO hand hygiene guidelines in the U.S., also found that only abou [...]
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March 6, 2014 | News Briefs

New York, NY - Investigators from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have reported more encouraging news about one of the most exciting methods of cancer treatment today. The largest clinical study ever conducted to date of patients with advanced leukemia found that 88 percent achieved complete remissions after being treated with genetically modified versions of their own immune cells. The results were published today in Science Translational Medicine. “These ext [...]
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March 5, 2014 | News Briefs

Cincinnati, OH - A more accurate and successful, yet complex approach used in designing an airplane is now taking off in the health care industry. The end result is helping patients with pulmonary disorders breathe easier, as well as their surgeons in considering novel treatment approaches.  Goutham Mylavarapu, a senior research associate in the University of Cincinnati Department of Aerospace Engineering, and Ephraim Gutmark, Ohio Eminent Scholar and UC distinguished professor of aerospac [...]
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March 4, 2014 | News Briefs

New York, NY - Terminal cancer patients who receive chemotherapy in the last months of their lives are less likely to die where they want and are more likely to undergo invasive medical procedures than those who do not receive chemotherapy, according to research in this week's BMJ. The findings underscore a disconnect between the type of care many cancer patients say they want and the kind they receive, and highlight the need for clearer and more balanced discussion of the harms and benefits of [...]
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March 3, 2014 | News Briefs

Sacramento, CA - Atypical development can be detected as early as 12 months of age among the siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder, a study published by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute and UCLA has found. Published online in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the study found that close to half of the younger siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) develop in an atypical fashion, with 17 percent developing ASD and an [...]
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February 27, 2014 | News Briefs

Parkland, TX - Two special elevators designed to expedite care of trauma patients are now installed in the new Parkland hospital, ready to play a life-saving role when the facility opens in 2015. They’re fast, traveling at a speed of 600 feet per minute, but the ride is smooth. It takes just 32 seconds to go from the helipad down 18 floors to the Emergency Department and Trauma Center on the first floor of the new facility. Parkland was the first Level 1 Trauma Center in North Texas and [...]
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February 18, 2014 | News Briefs

Royal Oak, MI - Urologists at Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak are first in the U.S. to treat localized prostate cancer with a transurethral ultrasound therapy guided by magnetic resonance imaging. The experimental treatment is designed to potentially reduce the long-term complications of traditional prostate cancer treatments. The first treatment on Jan. 25 marked the launch of the Transurethral Ultrasound Ablation research study at Beaumont evaluating the safety and effectiveness of a new medical [...]
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February 18, 2014 | News Briefs

Chicago, IL – Two types of regional anesthesia do not make patients more prone to falls in the first days after having knee replacement surgery as some have previously suggested, according to a study based on nearly 200,000 patient records which will appear in the March issue of Anesthesiology.  Spinal or epidural (neuraxial) anesthesia and peripheral nerve blocks (PNB) provide better pain control and faster rehabilitation and fewer complications than general anesthesia, research sho [...]
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February 17, 2014 | News Briefs

Chicago, IL - Larry Ambrose woke up one night, wandered into his kitchen but couldn’t completely read the time on his microwave. A few days later when he noticed his blood pressure was unusually high, he went to the hospital and was diagnosed as having a stroke. Ambrose, like 25 percent of all stroke patients, experienced a cryptogenic stroke, meaning despite numerous tests, physicians were unable to determine a cause.  “There were no warning signs and I felt there was nothing [...]
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February 17, 2014 | News Briefs

Seattle, WA - People who have suspected idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) without typical patterns on high resolution computed tomography (CT) scans could in future be spared the substantial risks of lung biopsy and be given a confident diagnosis of IPF based on clinical and radiological findings alone, according to new research published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. IPF causes progressive scarring of lung tissue, which eventually prevents the lungs from being able to supply the body w [...]
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February 12, 2014 | News Briefs

Park Ridge, IL - More than 14 percent of pregnant women were prescribed opioids for pain at some time during their pregnancy, according to a study posted to the online version of Anesthesiology. Given the surprising rate these medications were prescribed to pregnant women, more research is needed to assess the risk of opioids to unborn babies, the study suggests.  Prescriptions for opioids increased almost threefold in the general population, to more than 200 million between 1991 and 2009, [...]
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February 11, 2014 | News Briefs

Plymouth, UK - A retrospective study of almost 39,000 patients shows that opportunities to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at an earlier stage are frequently being missed in both primary and secondary care in the UK. The findings, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, reveal missed opportunities to diagnose COPD occurred in up to 85% of people. “The substantial numbers of patients misdiagnosed and under diagnosed in this study is a cause for concern. It is [...]
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February 11, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - The risk of a kidney donor developing kidney failure in the remaining organ is much lower than in the population at large, even when compared with people who have two kidneys, according to results of new Johns Hopkins research. The results, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, describes what is believed to be the largest  study ever conducted of kidney disease risk in living kidney donors, encompassing all such donors in the United States over a 17- [...]
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February 6, 2014 | News Briefs

Chappel Hill, NC – While ultrasound provides a less expensive and radiation-free alternative to detecting and monitoring cancer compared to technologies such as X-rays, CT scans, and MRIs, ultrasound has seen limited use in cancer treatment due to clarity and resolution issues. But researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have overcome this limitation by combining ultrasound with a contrast agent composed of tiny bubbles that pair with an antibody that many cancer cells produce at higher [...]
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January 29, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered that valproic acid, a widely prescribed drug for treating epilepsy, has the additional benefits of reducing fat accumulation in the liver and lowering blood sugar levels in the blood of obese mice. A summary of their research appears in this month’s issue of the journal Molecular Pharmacology. Fatty liver disease can lead to liver failure and is often caused by obesity and a high-fat diet. Obesity is also associated with the de [...]
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January 29, 2014 | News Briefs

Cambridge, UK - Children and adolescents with peanut allergies could benefit from treatment with oral immunotherapy (OIT), in which peanut protein is consumed in increasingly larger amounts on a regular basis to build up tolerance, according to a phase 2 trial published in The Lancet.  After 6 months of OIT, 84–91% of the children could safely tolerate daily ingestion of 800 mg of peanut protein (roughly the equivalent of five peanuts), at least 25 times as much peanut protein as the [...]
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January 28, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD- Ten years after a training program was completed, certain cognitive abilities were still improved in older adults, according to a new report. The findings suggest that cognitive interventions could help older people remain independent for longer. To test whether training could improve the cognitive abilities of older adults, healthy seniors were recruited from 6 cities between March 1998 and October 1999. The participants averaged 74 years of age and 14 years of education at the b [...]
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January 27, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - An HIV-specific poison can kill cells in which the virus is still reproducing despite antiretroviral therapy, a study in mice showed. Such targeted therapies could become a tool in strategies to combat HIV. Researchers have been searching for a targeted poison that could complement antiretroviral therapy by killing HIV-infected cells. A genetically designed, HIV-specific poison known as 3B3-PE38 was created in 1998 in the laboratories of Dr. Edward A. Berger of NIH’s Nati [...]
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January 23, 2014 | News Briefs

A new study concludes that evidence is lacking for substantial health benefits of vitamin D – and that results of several multimillion-dollar trials currently underway are unlikely to alter this view. The study, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, examines existing evidence from 40 randomised controlled trials – the gold standard for proving cause and effect – and concludes that vitamin D supplementation does not prevent heart attack, stroke, cancer, or bone [...]
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January 22, 2014 | News Briefs

Heart attack remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Previous studies have suggested that patients are more likely to die if they arrive at the hospital during weekends or nights. The report also said that this increased risk may result in thousands of extra deaths among heart attack patients in the United States every year. Mayo Clinic researchers Dr. Henry Ting and colleagues analyzed 48 studies that included a total of nearly 1.9 million patients to assess how arriving at hospitals duri [...]
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January 22, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Although the brain becomes smaller with age, the shrinkage seems to be fast-tracked in older adults with hearing loss, according to the results of a study by researchers from Johns Hopkins and the National Institute on Aging. The findings add to a growing list of health consequences associated with hearing loss, including increased risk of dementia, falls, hospitalizations, and diminished physical and mental health overall. For the study, Frank Lin, M.D., Ph.D., and his colleagu [...]
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January 22, 2014 | News Briefs

Andover, MA - Royal Philips announced the formation of Healthcare Informatics Solutions and Services, a new business group within Philips’ Healthcare sector that offers hospitals and health systems the customized clinical programs, advanced data analytics and interoperable, cloud-based platforms necessary to implement new models of care.   Building off a proven track record in improving the health of aging and at-risk populations, Healthcare Informatics Solutions and Services [...]
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January 22, 2014 | News Briefs

Washington, DC - National Center Risk Analysis Division head Jeff Stier testified today before a joint study committee of the Oklahoma State Senate and Oklahoma House of Representatives on e-cigarette regulation and tobacco harm reduction methods. Stier's testimony comes as various states and localities are considering policies regarding the public use of e-cigarettes, the smoke-free nicotine-delivery device that has helped many quit smoking cancer-causing tobacco cigarettes. New Yo [...]
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January 22, 2014 | News Briefs

Tampa, Fl - The risk of developing cervical cancer can be significantly decreased through human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. Despite calls from leading health and professional organizations for universal vaccination for girls ages 11 and 12, the most recently published national data indicate that only 14.5 percent of 11- and 12-year-old girls have received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine and 3 percent have completed the three-dose series. A new Moffitt Cancer Center study provides [...]
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January 22, 2014 | News Briefs

San Diego, CA - Cancer cells have something that every prisoner longs for—a master key that allows them to escape. A study in The Journal of Cell Biology describes how a protein that promotes tumor growth also enables cancer cells to use this key and metastasize. Unless it can enter a blood or lymphatic vessel, a cancer cell is imprisoned in the tissue where it arises. The growth factor VEGF is the tumor cell’s master key. It loosens connections between endothelial ce [...]
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January 22, 2014 | News Briefs

Challenging behavior is commonly associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in a recent study, 94 percent of children with ASD exhibited some form of challenging behavior, such as repeated and unusual vocalizations, aggression towards others, property destruction, leaving the supervision of a caregiver without permission and repeated and unusual body movements.   A new behavior intervention plan (BIP) builder is now available to help educators, clinicians and other behavior profess [...]
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January 16, 2014 | News Briefs

St Louis, MO - Your nose is not the only organ in your body that can sense cigarette smoke wafting through the air. Scientists at Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Iowa have shown that your lungs have odor receptors as well. Unlike the receptors in your nose, which are located in the membranes of nerve cells, the ones in your lungs are in the membranes of neuroendocrine cells. Instead of sending nerve impulses to your brain that allow it to “perceive” [...]
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January 14, 2014 | News Briefs

Miami Beach, FL - Chelation treatments reduce cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, and death in patients with diabetes but not in those who did not have diabetes, according to analyses of data from the National Institutes of Health-funded Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT). However, researchers say more research is needed before it’s known whether this promising finding leads to a treatment option. “These are striking results that, if supported by future research [...]
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January 13, 2014 | News Briefs

Chapel Hill, NC – Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have deployed a potential new weapon against HIV – a combination therapy that targets HIV-infected cells that standard therapies cannot kill. Using mouse models that have immune systems composed of human cells, researchers led by J. Victor Garcia, PhD, found that an antibody combined with a bacterial toxin can penetrate HIV-infected cells and kill them even though standard antiretroviral therapy, also known as ART, had no e [...]
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January 10, 2014 | News Briefs

Study suggests tubes, adenoidectomy reduce fluid in the middle ear and improve hearing in the short term, but tubes did not improve speech or language for children with middle ear fluid   Chappel Hill, NC - Watchful waiting or ear tube surgery? It is a decision faced by millions of families of children with recurrent or chronic otitis media with effusion (non-infected fluid in the middle ear) each year. Out of concern regarding long-term effects like hearing loss and potential development [...]
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January 10, 2014 | News Briefs

Changes to be implemented in two phases beginning in July 2014 Oakbrook Terrace, IL – The Joint Commission announced changes to its standards for accredited hospitals, critical access hospitals, and ambulatory health care organizations that provide diagnostic imaging services, including ambulatory organizations that have achieved Advanced Diagnostic Imaging certification. The changes will be effective July 1, 2014 with additional requirements to be phased in by 2015. The standards change [...]
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January 7, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - An updated screening tool that physicians administer to parents to help determine if a very young child has autism has been shown to be much more accurate than earlier versions at identifying children who could benefit from further evaluation, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health. The Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers — Revised, with Follow-Up (M-CHAT–R/F) — is a free, two-step screening tool used to detect children lik [...]
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January 7, 2014 | News Briefs

Philadelphia, PA - Hemispherx Biopharma, Inc. today announced publication of an article entitled “Emergence of a novel drug resistant H7N9 influenza virus: Evidence based clinical potential of a natural IFN-αlpha for infection control and treatment” in Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy early online edition pages 1-5, 2014. H7N9 is a recently identified virus associated with high mortality in humans with the potential to emerge as an agent for a global pandemic. New cases [...]
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January 6, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - People with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder have a higher risk for substance use, especially cigarette smoking, and protective factors usually associated with lower rates of substance use do not exist in severe mental illness, according to a new study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health. Estimates based on past studies suggest that people diagnosed with mood or anxiety disorders are [...]
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January 6, 2014 | News Briefs

CHICAGO, Il – Sometimes a left hook is just what the doctor ordered.   Paula Weiner, for one, is looking forward to finding out. The Chicago resident was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease three years ago when she noticed a tremor in her hand that wouldn’t go away. Since that day Weiner has been more active than ever, taking art classes and becoming a Tai Chi coach. Every Monday she takes a bus down Lake Shore Drive to lead her class. “It’s all about sta [...]
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January 6, 2014 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - Drivers eat, reach for the phone, text, or otherwise take their eyes off the road about 10 percent of the time they are behind the wheel, according to a study using video technology and in-vehicle sensors. Risks of distracted driving were greatest for newly licensed teen drivers, who were substantially more likely than adults to be involved in a crash or near miss while texting or engaging in tasks secondary to driving, according to the researchers from the National Institutes of [...]
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January 6, 2014 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Some 30 minutes of meditation daily may improve symptoms of anxiety and depression, a new Johns Hopkins analysis of previously published research suggests. “A lot of people use meditation, but it’s not a practice considered part of mainstream medical therapy for anything,” says Madhav Goyal, M.D., M.P.H., an assistant professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and leader of a study published online [...]
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January 6, 2014 | News Briefs

Houston, TX - Surgeons at the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center (MEDVAMC) recently performed successful groundbreaking minimally invasive vascular procedures on two military Veterans.   The surgeons performed the City of Houston’s first implantations of a new type of stent graft, called a fenestrated endograft.  Each stent graft (the Zenith Fenestrated AAA Endovascular Graft by Cook Medical) is custom-made from a 3-D computer model of the patient's anatomy, which is based [...]
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January 6, 2014 | News Briefs

Drinking alcohol appears to have a dose-dependent inverse (opposite) association with the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) and researchers suggest their findings give no support to advising patients with MS to completely refrain from alcohol, according to a study by Anna Karin Hedstrӧm, M.D., of the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, and colleagues. The results of previous studies have been inconsistent about the impact of alcohol and the risk of developing MS. Researchers investig [...]
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December 28, 2013 | News Briefs

Malden, MA - Florence Nightingale's legacy not only remains – but has never been more important. The full scope of her influence on contemporary nurses, nursing care and nursing research, and, for example, on social and health reform, including sanitation, hygiene, hospital design and statistics is often not fully appreciated. Although she is best known as the founder of modern nursing, having established a curriculum and training school for nurses, it is her pioneering health reforms that [...]
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December 28, 2013 | News Briefs

Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is defined as a sustained reduction of systolic blood pressure (SBP) of at least 20 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of 10 mm Hg within 3 minutes of standing or head-up tilt to at least 60° on a tilt table.[1] The diagnosis can be made easily at the bedside by measuring blood pressure (BP) and heart rate supine and after 1 and 3 minutes of standing. The most sensitive and consistent measurements are the ones obtained early in the morning, when patients ar [...]
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December 28, 2013 | News Briefs

The availability of an effective and reliable colorectal cancer screening tool is of paramount importance in the health service plans of Western countries to permit early diagnosis and/or identification of precursor polyps. Improved tests are required that are able consistently to show high sensitivity and specificity for these diagnoses, and that are easy to perform and capable of engendering high patient compliance. Recent advances in molecular biology in colorectal cancer have focused on seve [...]
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December 18, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - In a study of national data on colon surgery, Johns Hopkins researchers found that while patients who undergo either minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery or the high-tech robotic approach have similar outcomes, robotic surgery is significantly more expensive. The findings provide a counterpoint to the aggressive advertising used by some hospitals to tout benefits of the pricey new gadget, even before research has been done to learn whether robotic surgery is actually better f [...]
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December 18, 2013 | News Briefs

St Louis, MO - Bariatric surgery helps patients lose weight and get rid of obesity-related diseases, although the risk of complications, reoperation and death remain, according to updated analyses of the effects of weight-loss surgery by Su-Hsin Chang, of the Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, and colleagues. The prevalence of obesity is well-established and so are the outcomes of bariatric surgery, such as the remission of diabetes and hypertension. Researchers reviewed [...]
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December 18, 2013 | News Briefs

CHAPEL HILL, NC – Researchers found that two on-the-rise esophagus conditions are so similar that even a biopsy is not enough to distinguish one disease from the other. One condition is called eosinophilic esophagitis, or EoE. The other is PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia, or PPI-REE. Symptoms for each condition include difficulty swallowing, persistent heartburn, and getting food stuck in the throat. Both are diagnosed with an endoscopy, which reveals high numbers of a certain type [...]
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December 18, 2013 | News Briefs

Columbus, OH - An act recently signed by President Obama will make it easier to provide epinephrine to children with severe food allergies in schools, even without a prescription. Physicians at Nationwide Children’s Hospital hope the act will encourage the remaining 20 states to pass legislation, incentivizing and, in some cases, requiring that schools to have this medication available for all students since up to 6 percent of children in the United States are now diagnosed with a food all [...]
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December 18, 2013 | News Briefs

Link between high cholesterol and estrogen-mimicking molecule 27HC suggests statins could reduce breast cancer risk and severity Durham, NC — Keeping cholesterol in check, either with statins or a healthy diet may reduce the risk of breast cancer, according to research at the Duke Cancer Institute. Furthermore, lowering cholesterol may delay or prevent tumor resistance to common endocrine therapies such as the anti-estrogen tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, which can be rendered ineffect [...]
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December 18, 2013 | News Briefs

Dallas, TX - To help hospital emergency departments (EDs) prepare for the height of flu season and the associated overcrowding, T-System is offering T Sheets® flu documentation templates free of charge to all hospitals and healthcare providers. Providers can download the documentation tool. The severity of the 2012-2013 flu season was a reminder of how unpredictable influenza can be. EDs across the country operated at capacity and were forced to set up secondary treatment areas in pa [...]
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December 17, 2013 | News Briefs

Portland, OR - Medical science has known for years that people who drink moderate amounts of alcohol actually have a reduced risk of death. In general, they are healthier and have better cardiovascular function that those who don't drink alcohol at all. Now, new research from Oregon Health & Science University adds a fascinating twist: moderate drinking may actually bolster our immune system and help it fight off infection. The research, published Dec. 17 in the journal Vaccine, not o [...]
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December 17, 2013 | News Briefs

Chicago, IL  – For persons with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis, nonsurgical periodontal treatment did not result in improved glycemic control, according to a study appearing in the December 18 issue of JAMA.  Emerging evidence implicates inflammation in the development of type 2 diabetes. Chronic periodontitis, a destructive inflammatory disorder of the soft and hard tissues supporting the teeth, is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. Nearly half of the U.S. popula [...]
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December 17, 2013 | News Briefs

Chicago, Il  – Eighteen medical communication companies (MCC's) received about $100 million from 13 pharmaceutical and one device company and all or most were for profit, conducted continuing medical education programs, and tracked website behavior, with some 3 rd party information sharing, according to a study appearing in the December 18 issue of JAMA. “Medical communication companies are among the most significant but least analyzed health care stakeholders. Supported mainly [...]
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December 12, 2013 | News Briefs

Certain manufactures are promoting the use of nipple aspirate tests as a stand-alone evaluation tool for screening and diagnosing breast cancer, claiming they are an alternative to biopsy or mammography. They also claim that a nipple aspirate test can detect pre-cancerous abnormalities and diagnose breast cancer before mammography with just a sample of a few cells.  The FDA is concerned that women will believe these misleading claims about a nipple aspirate test and not get mammograms [...]
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December 12, 2013 | News Briefs

San Antonio, TX — Combining the chemotherapy drugs docetaxel and carboplatin with the HER2-targeted therapy trastuzumab was identified to be an ideal postsurgery treatment option for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer, regardless of tumor size and whether or not disease has spread to the lymph nodes, according to results from the BETH study presented here at the 2013 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. "Worldwide, anthracyclines such as doxorubicin [Adriamycin] and epirubicin have [...]
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December 12, 2013 | News Briefs

SAN ANTONIO — Breast cancer incidence among postmenopausal women at high risk for developing the disease was significantly reduced by the antihormone therapy anastrozole,indicating that the drug may be an effective new option for breast cancer prevention for this group of women, according to initial results of a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial presented here at the 2013 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium and simultaneously in The Lancet. About 80 percent of women diagn [...]
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December 12, 2013 | News Briefs

Philadelphia, PA - Genomic tests that determine the molecular subtype of a woman’s breast cancer provide a more precise prognosis and valuable guidance about the best treatment, according to new research led by Massimo Cristofanilli, M.D, Director of the Jefferson Breast Care Center at the Kimmel Cancer Center (KCC) and Thomas Jefferson University and Hospitals.  Dr. Cristofanilli and colleagues concluded that the genomic tests MammaPrint® and [...]
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December 12, 2013 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - A network of 25 regional stroke centers working with nearby satellite facilities will span the country, have teams of researchers representing every medical specialty needed for stroke care and will address the three prongs of stroke research: prevention, treatment and recovery.  “The new system is intended to streamline stroke research, by centralizing approval and review, lessening time and costs of clinical trials, and assembling a comprehensive data sharing system, [...]
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December 10, 2013 | News Briefs

Chapel Hill, NC - Screening to detect medical conditions has become standard practice for many diseases, but insufficient attention has been paid to the potential for harm, according to research conducted at the University of North Carolina. “I think guideline groups, just as they are systematic about thinking about benefits, need to be systematic about thinking about harms. We should not implement a screening program until we know enough to have a clear understanding of both benefits and [...]
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December 9, 2013 | News Briefs

Boston, MA – For nearly half a century, contact lenses have been proposed as a means of ocular drug delivery that may someday replace eye drops, but achieving controlled drug release has been a significant challenge. Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School Department of Ophthalmology, Boston Children’s Hospital, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are one step closer to an eye drop-free reality with the development of a drug-eluting contact lens desi [...]
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December 9, 2013 | News Briefs

Tampa, FL – This month Sleep Apnea Treatment Centers of America (SATCOA) reached a milestone by performing its 1,000th treatment to cure sleep apnea. With multiple locations across the country, the company offers an innovative, in-office treatment option to the nearly 18 million Americans who suffer with sleep apnea. Traditionally people with this disease were only given the choice between widely unpopular masks and devices including the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine f [...]
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December 5, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Johns Hopkins scientists have found evidence that cancer triggers the autoimmune disease scleroderma, which causes thickening and hardening of the skin and widespread organ damage.   A report on the discovery, published today in Science, also suggests that a normal immune system is critical for preventing the development of common types of cancer. According to researchers, patients with scleroderma often make immune proteins or antibodies to another protein, called RPC [...]
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December 5, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Using a powerful gene-hunting technique for the first time in mammalian brain cells, researchers at Johns Hopkins report they have identified a gene involved in building the circuitry that relays signals through the brain. The gene is a likely player in the aging process in the brain, the researchers say. Additionally, in demonstrating the usefulness of the new method, the discovery paves the way for faster progress toward identifying genes involved in complex mental illnesses su [...]
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December 4, 2013 | News Briefs

New York, NY - Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College have shown that the presence of a particular protein in biopsied prostate tissue substantially increases the likelihood that cancer will develop in that organ. The discovery will likely help physicians decide how closely to monitor men potentially at risk for the cancer. Their findings, reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, are the first to quantify, in the setting of a clinical trial, the increased risk of prostate cancer de [...]
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December 3, 2013 | News Briefs

Los Angeles, CA - People who have diverticulosis, or pouches in the lining of the colon, often worry that they will eventually develop the painful and sometimes serious condition of diverticulitis, as previous research has shown that one in four of those with the condition will. Now, in a 15-year study that contradicts the common wisdom on rate of progression from diverticulosis to diverticulitis, UCLA researchers show that the risk is significantly lower than previously thought, about 1 percen [...]
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December 2, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Researchers have identified a protein that causes loss of function in immune cells combatting HIV. The scientists report in a paper appearing online Dec. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation that the protein, Sprouty-2, is a promising target for future HIV drug development, since disabling it could help restore the cells’ ability to combat the virus that causes AIDS. “A large part of the reason we lose wars against viruses that cause chronic infection [...]
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November 26, 2013 | News Briefs

Eugene, OR - Carbon monoxide poisoning, associated with fuel-burning heat sources, increases over the cold weather months with incidences of acute exposure increasing over the holidays, when heaters and cooking apparatuses are heavily used. PeaceHealth carbon monoxide diagnosis and treatment expert, Dr. Kialing Perez, Director of the Hyperbaric Center at Sacred Heart Medical Center offers the following tips for a safe, healthy holiday: Put Your Detector Through its Paces: Test your carbon mon [...]
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November 21, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Results of a Johns Hopkins-led study have identified a possible link between a history of sudden drops in blood pressure and the most common form of irregular heartbeat. The study suggests that a bout of orthostatic hypotension — a steep blood pressure drop that occurs when a person stands up after a period of lying down — appears to be associated with an overall 40 percent increase in the risk of developing atrial fibrillation over the following two decades. While [...]
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November 21, 2013 | News Briefs

LOS ALAMOS, NM — Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are investigating the complex relationships between the spread of the HIV virus in a population (epidemiology) and the actual, rapid evolution of the virus (phylogenetics) within each patient’s body. “We have developed novel ways of estimating epidemics dynamics such as who infected whom, and the true population incidence of infection versus mere diagnoses dates,” said Thomas Leitner, principal investigator. [...]
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November 21, 2013 | News Briefs

Washington, DC - As we celebrate the Nation’s 10th annual Family Health History Day this Thanksgiving, I encourage everyone to spend time talking with their family members about their health.  National Family Health History Day is a great opportunity to draw attention to the importance of sharing family health history. Both rare diseases and common ones, like heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, can run in families. Understanding your family health history can help you and your healt [...]
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November 21, 2013 | News Briefs

The FDA is warning health care professionals of the rare but serious risk of heart attack and death with use of the cardiac nuclear stress test agents Lexiscan (regadenoson) and Adenoscan (adenosine). FDA has approved changes to the drug labels to reflect these serious events and updated recommendations for use of these agents. At this time, data limitations prevent FDA from determining if there is a difference in risk of heart attack or death between Lexiscan and Adenoscan. The Warnings & [...]
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November 21, 2013 | News Briefs

Using medical devices that FDA has now cleared for marketing, a laboratory could sequence your genome to look for any abnormalities in your genes that could be responsible for your illness. This information would be relayed to your doctor and used to determine the course of treatment. This is called “next generation sequencing” because it’s another step towards a future in personalized medical care that few of us could have envisioned even a decade ago.  A genome is the [...]
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November 19, 2013 | News Briefs

WASHINGTON, DC - Team-based health care delivery models are quickly emerging as the preferred method for providing coordinated, cost-effective, high-quality health care for patients and today the American Medical Association's House of Delegates adopted new recommendations for creating payment mechanisms to sustain these promising new models of care. "The success rate of physician-led team-based models of care has been proven time and again by trusted industry leaders like the Ma [...]
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November 19, 2013 | News Briefs

Every year, on the third Thursday of November, the Great American Smokeout (GASO) challenges tobacco users to kick the habit for just one day. Even though it may not be the last day they ever use tobacco, TRICARE beneficiaries are encouraged to participate as the first step toward quitting. One tool beneficiaries can use to make GASO tobacco-free is Quit Tobacco – Make Everyone Proud (www.ucanquit2.org/facts/gaso). Become one of the millions of smokers across the country that put down the [...]
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November 18, 2013 | News Briefs

Los Angeles, CA - Men with prostate cancer who ate a low-fat diet and took fish oil supplements had lower levels of pro-inflammatory substances in their blood and a lower cell cycle progression score, a measure used to predict cancer recurrence, than men who ate a typical Western diet, UCLA researchers found. The findings are important because lowering the cell cycle progression (CCP) score may help prevent prostate cancers from becoming more aggressive, said study lead author William Aronson, [...]
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November 18, 2013 | News Briefs

Because combination products blur the lines among drugs, biologics and devices, the challenge is determining which rules take precedence — drug GMP rules or device QSR rules. These two regulations are similar, but where they differ, you must take extra steps to ensure both rules are complied with. And numerous variables come into play when deciding which rules apply in which circumstances, such as: Drug and device components made at separate facilities  Drug and device components [...]
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November 18, 2013 | News Briefs

CHICAGO, IL – Seven years ago, Keith Brown decided to skip the elevator and take the stairs to the ninth floor of the Chicago parking garage where he worked. He only made it to the sixth floor.  “I was gasping for air,” Brown said. “This wasn’t something that comes from being a little out of shape or from getting a little older. I knew something was seriously wrong.”  Brown was diagnosed with COPD and emphysema, the third leading cause of [...]
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November 18, 2013 | News Briefs

Chicago, Il – The overall use of breast magnetic resonance imaging has increased, with the procedure most commonly used for diagnostic evaluations and screenings, according to a study published by JAMA Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication. While breast MRI is being used increasingly, its sensitivity leads to higher false-positive rates and it is also more expensive. Guidelines from the American Cancer Society (ACS) indicate that breast MRI should be used to screen asymptomatic wo [...]
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November 18, 2013 | News Briefs

Dallas, TX - This downloadable spreadsheet is a companion tool to the 2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk. The spreadsheet enables health care providers and patients to estimate 10-year and lifetime risks for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), defined as coronary death or nonfatal myocardial infarction, or fatal or nonfatal stroke, based on the Pooled Cohort Equations and the work of Lloyd-Jones, et al., respectively. The information required to esti [...]
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November 14, 2013 | News Briefs

Long Beach, CA - Diabetes kills one person every eight seconds. Meanwhile one in two people with diabetes don’t know they have it. Minority populations have a higher prevalence of diabetes than non-Hispanic whites, and with more than half of the population in Long Beach at higher risk, diabetes is a serious concern for the community. In November, Long Beach Memorial, Community Hospital Long Beach and Miller Children’s Hospital Long Beach will join forces to raise awareness of the imp [...]
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November 14, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a more accurate way to calculate low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, the so-called “bad” form of blood fat that can lead to hardening of the arteries and increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. If confirmed and adopted by medical laboratories that routinely calculate blood cholesterol for patients, the researchers say their formula would give patients and their doctors a much more accurate assessment of LDL cholest [...]
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November 12, 2013 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - A gene variant common in African-Americans predicts that people with that gene who also have chronic kidney disease (CKD) are twice as likely to progress to kidney failure as African-Americans without the high-risk gene and white people with CKD. People with the high-risk gene also tend to lose kidney function at twice the rate of those without the gene, according to the research, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health. Investigators from the Chronic Renal Insuffic [...]
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November 8, 2013 | News Briefs

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are studying the quality, effectiveness and safety of generic drugs used to treat depression. The research is supported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is the only study of its kind funded by the agency. The study will determine whether brand-name 300-mg bupropion hydrochloride (HCl) extended-release (ER) tablets — sold commercially as Wellbutrin XL — and the various generic versions of [...]
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November 8, 2013 | News Briefs

New York, NY - The FDA today proposed guidelines to eliminate the use of transfats in the U.S. food supply. According to the New York Times, the agency hopes to declare that transfats are no longer "generally recognized as safe." The proposal has to endure 60 days of public comments before moving forward. Under the proposal, companies would have to scientifically prove that partially hydrogenated oils are safe to eat, even though the Institute of Medicine has reported there is no safe lev [...]
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November 8, 2013 | News Briefs

New York, NY -  Through an innovative public-private partnership, the National Institutes of Health and the Children’s Museum of Manhattan (CMOM) have created a new health educational curriculum — EatPlayGrow: Creative Activities for a Healthy Start — for children ages 2-5 and their parents. The curriculum was launched today at a press conference in New York City attended by George Mensah, M.D., senior advisor from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLB [...]
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November 8, 2013 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - Researchers have launched an early-stage clinical trial of an investigational vaccine designed to prevent genital herpes disease. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, is sponsoring the Phase I trial.  Genital herpes is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections in the United States. Most genital herpes cases are caused by infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2); however, he [...]
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November 8, 2013 | News Briefs

Among hospitalized children diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, regurgitation), infants younger than 2 months are more likely than older infants to undergo surgical antireflux procedures (ARPs), even though GERD in that age group is normal and resolves itself in many cases, according to a study by Jarod McAteer, M.D., M.P.H., of Seattle Children’s Hospital, and colleagues. GERD is a common diagnosis in infants and children, and ARPS are one of the most common procedures [...]
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November 4, 2013 | News Briefs

PLYMOUTH MEETING, PA—Each year, ECRI Institute, an independent nonprofit that researches the best approaches to improving patient care, offers an invaluable patient safety service to the healthcare ccommunity. The 2014 Top 10 Health Technology Hazards list raises awareness of the potential dangers associated with the use of medical devices and helps healthcare providers minimize the risk of technology-related adverse events.  The 2014 list [...]
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October 30, 2013 | News Briefs

Columbus, OH - In the first molecular genetic study of families with a history of both language impairment and autism, scientists may have uncovered a shared origin for the two conditions, an important step toward explaining why some cases of autism are accompanied by language difficulties and others are not. The study, a collaboration of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospitalwith experts at Rutgers University, indicates that specific language impairment disorder, on [...]
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October 29, 2013 | News Briefs

Boston, MA – A fine-grained scan of DNA in lung cancer cells has revealed a gene fusion – a forced merger of two normally separate genes – that spurs the cells to divide rapidly, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the University of Colorado Cancer Center report in a new paper in the journal Nature Medicine. Treating the cells with a compound that blocks a protein encoded by one of those genes – NTRK1 – caused the cells to di [...]
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October 28, 2013 | News Briefs

Chappel Hill, NC – Dendrites were once thought to be passive wiring in the brain. But now researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have shown that these dendrites do more than relay information from one neuron to the next. They actively process information, multiplying the brain’s computing power. “Suddenly, it’s as if the processing power of the brain is much greater than we had originally thought,” said Spencer Smith, PhD, an assistant [...]
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October 25, 2013 | News Briefs

San Diego, CA – Severe liver damage, and even failure, has been associated with the consumption of weight loss supplements, an herbal supplement and an energy drink, according to four separate case reports presented at the American College of Gastroenterology’s 78th Annual Scientific Meeting in San Diego, CA. Case Report 1: SlimQuick™- Associated Hepatotoxicity Resulting in Fulminant Liver FailureThere have been many reports of toxicity associated with dietary supplement use [...]
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October 24, 2013 | News Briefs

New York, NY - Ahead of the translational medicine conference What Will it Take to Achieve an AIDS-free World? The Lancet, and The Lancet Infectious Diseases published a set of new Reviews and Comments analysing the changing landscape of HIV / AIDS research. Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy has potential to reduce the incidence of HIV, but logistical challenges must not prevent best use of medicines HIV as a chronic disease poses new challenges for treatment and over-burd [...]
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October 24, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Just when some scientists were becoming more hopeful about finding a strategy to outwit HIV’s ability to resist, evade and otherwise survive efforts to rid it from the body, another hurdle has emerged to foil their plans, new research from Johns Hopkins shows. In a cover-story report on the research to be published in the journal Cell, Johns Hopkins infectious disease experts say the amount of potentially active, dormant forms of HIV hiding in infected immune T cells [...]
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October 24, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Low levels of the “sunshine” vitamin D appear to increase a child’s risk of anemia, according to new research led by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.  The study, published online Oct. 10 in the Journal of Pediatrics, is believed to be the first one to extensively explore the link between the two conditions in children. The researchers caution that their results are not proof of cause and effect, but rather evidence of a complex i [...]
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October 18, 2013 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - Investigators from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Hormone Trials are reaffirming conclusions that hormone therapy is not recommended for the prevention of chronic disease, but may remain a reasonable option for the short-term management of menopausal symptoms for younger women. “While the risk versus benefits profile for estrogen alone is positive for younger women, it’s important to note that these data only pertain to the short-term use of hormone therapy [...]
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October 18, 2013 | News Briefs

Arlington, VA - A new study suggests a growing number of U.S. adolescents lack antibodies that may help protect them later in life against an increasingly important cause of genital herpes. Published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases; the findings show that fewer of today’s teens have been exposed in their childhood to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a common cause of cold sores, than U.S. adolescents in previous years. Without these antibodies, today’s teens may b [...]
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October 15, 2013 | News Briefs

Silver Spring, MD - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Liposorber LA-15 System to treat pediatric patients with primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) either before transplant, or after renal (kidney) transplantation in which there is recurrence of FSGS.FSGS is a chronic disease in which scar tissue develops on the parts of the kidneys that filter waste out of the blood and in other essential parts of the kidney. FSGS causes excessive loss of protein from the blood i [...]
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October 15, 2013 | News Briefs

Gainesville, FL — Although some health care providers may overlook alternative therapies when treating functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, University of Florida faculty members have found evidence that hypnosis and cognitive behavioral therapy may benefit patients suffering from these diseases. Led by researchers Oliver Grundmann of the UF College of Pharmacy and Saunjoo “Sunny” Yoon of the UF College of Nursing, the study was published in the Eur [...]
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October 15, 2013 | News Briefs

Houston, TX – Doctors and researchers at the Texas Heart Institute (THI) are recruiting patients who suffer from peripheral artery disease (PAD) for a new clinical trial to assess the benefits and risks in the use of adult stem cells from patients’ own bone marrow to treat leg pain commonly associated with the disease. PAD affects between 8 million and 10 million Americans. The primary leg symptom is called “intermittent claudication”, which can manifest as aching, [...]
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October 3, 2013 | News Briefs

A new class of cholesterol-lowering drugs that target a recently discovered regulator of harmful cholesterol could be an alternative or complementary treatment for the 30 million people who take statins, after the first trial in humans confirms the technique’s feasibility and safety. A single dose of the small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) drug candidate ALN-PCS cut levels of LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) in healthy volunteers by up to 57%, and 40% on average more than those gi [...]
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October 3, 2013 | News Briefs

Cleveland, Oh - Dr. Valeriy Moysaenko and CHAMPS Oncology’s Toni Hare are pleased to announce the release of their latest collaboration, a white paper entitled, How Health Reform is Transforming U.S. Healthcare: Implications for Cancer Care Providers. This in-depth publication examines the key provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act that impact cancer care. From the Physician Quality Reporting System’s aim to boost quality measures reporting to the potential [...]
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October 3, 2013 | News Briefs

AURORA, Colo.  - There has never been a better time in the history of nursing than now for nurses to advance their nursing skills as our nation’s top hospitals embrace nurses pursing career advancement and professional development to implement best practices across these complex health systems. U.S. News & World Report recently surveyed 5,000 hospitals to rank the best in 15 adult specialties. Of 147 hospitals that were nationally ranked, American Sentinel University has students [...]
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October 3, 2013 | News Briefs

Carefusion Avea Ventilator: Recall - Underreporting Of Tidal Volume If used In Conjunction With Neonatal Hotwire Flow Sensor AUDIENCE: Risk Manager, Anesthesiology, Critical Care Medicine ISSUE: CareFusion announced a voluntary recall of AVEA ventilators regarding barometric pressure sensor compensation when using the neonatal wye hot wire flow sensor. AVEA ventilators may experience an underreporting of tidal volume if used in conjunction with the neonatal hotwire flow sensor. The patien [...]
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October 3, 2013 | News Briefs

New York, NY -  Early treatment of heart attack patients with an inexpensive beta-blocker drug called metoprolol, while in transit to the hospital, can significantly reduce damage to the heart during a myocardial infarction, according to clinical trial study results. The study, involving emergency ambulances and seven hospitals across Spain, shows this simple, low-cost intervention strategy with metoprolol could be easily extended throughout the world, to provide significant clinica [...]
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October 1, 2013 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - Researchers developed a lightweight microscope that attaches to a cell phone. The compact fluorescent imaging device can detect single nanoparticles and viruses. It might one day be used to conduct biomedical tests in remote and resource-limited areas. A human hair has a diameter of around 100 microns. You can see a single hair with your eyes, and you can even take a picture of one with a smartphone. In comparison, a virus may have a diameter of around 100-300 nanometers (nm). It [...]
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September 30, 2013 | News Briefs

Amsterdam, The Netherlands - Roche announced that the company has presented important new data on MPDL3280A (RG7446, also known as anti-PDL1). The data from an updated analysis of a Phase 1 study assessing MPDL3280A monotherapy in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) showed that MPDL3280A was generally well tolerated and yielded often rapid, durable responses. Response rates were particularly high in patients who had greater expression of PD-L1 in their tumors [...]
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September 30, 2013 | News Briefs

AMSTERDAM - The world faces a rapidly growing burden of cancer which will overwhelm governments unless the medical and pharma industry takes the lead on a multi-billion dollar private-public fund. In a report on how rates of cancer diagnosis and death are rising across the world while access to diagnosis and treatment is extremely patchy, experts described the economics of the problem as daunting and current financing models as broken. "It is bad to have cancer, and worse to have cancer if you [...]
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September 24, 2013 | News Briefs

SUNNYVALE, CA -  Intuitive Surgical, Inc. (Nasdaq:ISRG), the global leader in minimally invasive robotic-assisted surgery, today announced it received FDA 510(k) clearance for expanded use of its da Vinci® Fluorescence Imaging Vision System (Firefly™) for the da Vinci® Surgical System. Firefly imaging can now be used during gallbladder surgery. The Firefly Fluorescence Imaging Vision System enables surgeons to use a special video camera and glowing dye to view blood flowing i [...]
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September 24, 2013 | News Briefs

Silver Spring, MD - Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced a final rule for the unique device identification system (UDI) that, once implemented, will provide a consistent way to identify medical devices.   The UDI system has the potential to improve the quality of information in medical device adverse events reports, which will help the FDA identify product problems more quickly, better target recalls, and improve patient safety. The FDA has worked closely with indus [...]
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September 24, 2013 | News Briefs

London, England - A group of international scientists including a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researcher have confirmed that life really could have come from out of this world. The team shock compressed an icy mixture, similar to what is found in comets, which then created a number of amino acids - the building blocks of life.This is the first experimental confirmation of what LLNL scientist Nir Goldman first predicted in 2010 and again in 2013 using computer simulations performed on [...]
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September 19, 2013 | News Briefs

London, UK - The long-term results of the landmark START trials conclusively confirm that giving radiotherapy as a lower overall dose in fewer, higher doses over a shorter treatment time (hypofractionated) is at least as effective and safe as the current international standard for most women with early breast cancer. These 10-year results reassure us that 3 weeks of radiotherapy is as good as the 5 weeks still used in many countries, with less damage to nearby healthy tissue, as well as being m [...]
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September 17, 2013 | News Briefs

London, UK - Scientists have discovered a potential new way of treating a type of blood cancer called myeloma that poisons cancer cells with their own secretions.  The research, conducted by a team at The Institute of Cancer Research in London, found it was possible to use one of myeloma’s own weapons against it. Myeloma cells secrete damaging substances called paraproteins into the bloodstream, often poisoning the patient’s kidneys. But the research, published in&nb [...]
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September 16, 2013 | News Briefs

Danville, PA – Geisinger researchers have developed a simple scoring system (DiaRem), based on four readily available preoperative patient characteristics, that can predict which candidates for gastric bypass surgery are likely to achieve Type 2 diabetes remission within 5 years. A predictive model is likely to help patients and clinicians better manage the disease and could even save lives. “Our novel DiaRem score will give patients and physicians a scientifically valid way of asse [...]
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September 12, 2013 | News Briefs

San Diego, CA – Cadaver dissection has long been a rite of passage for medical students, but a new era of individualized medicine offers doctors in training a more advanced way of delving into the depths of the human body through whole genome sequencing. In a Science Translational Medicine editorial this week, Scripps Health Chief Academic Officer Eric Topol, M.D., called on medical schools to make genetic dissection part of their standard curriculum by providing each student with a searc [...]
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September 11, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Johns Hopkins scientists have found that levels of certain fats found in cerebral spinal fluid can predict which patients with HIV are more likely to become intellectually impaired. The researchers believe that these fat markers reflect disease-associated changes in how the brain metabolizes these fat molecules. These changes disrupt the brain cells’ ability to regulate the activity of cells’ “garbage disposals” meant to degrade and flush the brain of mol [...]
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September 10, 2013 | News Briefs

By: Dr. Francis Collins The average life expectancy in the United States currently is about 79. And, unsurprisingly, more than two-thirds of Americans say they’d like to live another 10 to 20 years longer. One possible route to a longer life is to cut calories drastically. Not much fun perhaps, but there’s evidence it works in yeast, worms, and mice—but probably not in monkeys. The potential life-extending strategy that I’d like to tell you about today focuses on t [...]
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September 10, 2013 | News Briefs

Phnom Penh, KH - For the first time, scientists have developed a novel and rapid way to test whether the most common and lethal form of malaria is resistant to potent artemisinin drugs. “In the race against time to stop the spread of artemisinin-resistant malaria, new diagnostic tools are urgently needed to identify and track resistant parasites. These simple in-vitro and ex-vivo ring-stage survival assays (RSAs) can clearly identify artemisinin-resistant, slow-clearing Plasmodium fa [...]
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September 9, 2013 | News Briefs

Los Angeles, CA - UCLA researchers have described a new form of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) that occurs after an acute bout of diverticulitis, a finding that may help lead to better management of symptoms and relief for patients. The discovery of this new condition, called Post-Diverticulitis Irritable Bowel Syndrome (PDV-IBS), validates the irritable bowel symptoms that many patients report long after suffering a bout of diverticulitis, but that many physicians wave off as being part of the [...]
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September 4, 2013 | News Briefs

Colombus, OH - A new study in animal models suggests that blocking a protein that helps the hepatitis C virus thrive, could restore immune function, allowing the body to fight infection. The work, led by teams at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and Emory University, was published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Previous studies show that antibody treatments which inhibit the protein, called programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), can shrink [...]
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September 3, 2013 | News Briefs

Houston, TX - Vietnam Veteran Bruce Fry of Houston has participated in a study sponsored by the Rehabilitation R&D at the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center (MEDVAMC) to treat his symptoms related to Parkinson’s disease (PD). “One of the main problems associated with Parkinson’s is that walking and balance are impaired,” said Craig Workman, M.S, MEDVAMC Research Coordinator. “These patients really have to concentrate on their movement, and this effort can be [...]
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September 3, 2013 | News Briefs

Chapel Hill, NC – Problems with a key group of enzymes called topoisomerases can have profound effects on the genetic machinery behind brain development and potentially lead to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to research announced in the journal Nature. Scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have described a finding that represents a significant advance in the hunt for environmental factors behind autism and lends new insights into the disorder [...]
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August 27, 2013 | News Briefs

Gainesville, FL — University of Florida College of Pharmacy researchers are working closely with colleagues at UF Health to identify hospital patients at greatest risk for preventable adverse drug events. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Foundation has awarded a two-year, $499,000 grant to College of Pharmacy researcher Almut Winterstein, Ph.D., to lead a UF Health research team that will develop and validate a complexity score to help hospitals determine the best pharmac [...]
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August 26, 2013 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - Levels of a protein in the urine of kidney transplant recipients can distinguish those at low risk of developing kidney injury from those at high risk, a study suggests. The results also suggest that low levels of this protein, called CXCL9, can rule out rejection as a cause of kidney injury. The study appears online in the American Journal of Transplantation. The work was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes [...]
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August 23, 2013 | News Briefs

Chicago, IL – Northwestern’s Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute recently enrolled its first subject in ABSORB III, a clinical trial to study a “disappearing” heart device for the treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). The investigational device, called the Absorb™ Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold (BVS), made by healthcare company Abbott, is a small mesh tube designed to perform like a metallic stent by opening a blocked coronary artery and restoring blood flow [...]
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August 21, 2013 | News Briefs

Oakland, CA - A simple scoring system that may predict the risk of dementia in seniors with type 2 diabetes has been developed by researchers. The system - which scores patients based on their age, health issues and education - could help doctors closely monitor diabetes patients at the highest risk of dementia and begin early treatment if needed, said Dr. Rachel Whitmer and her colleagues at the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in California. The researchers created the scoring system [...]
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August 20, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - People with severe encephalitis are much more likely to die if they develop severe swelling in the brain, intractable seizures or low blood platelet counts, regardless of the cause of their illness, according to new Johns Hopkins research. The investigators say the findings suggest that if physicians are on the lookout for these potentially reversible conditions and treat them aggressively at the first sign of trouble, patients are more likely to survive. “The factors mos [...]
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August 20, 2013 | News Briefs

Rochester, MN - A new population-based study has found that patients with glioblastoma who died in 2010, after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of Bevacizumab, had lived significantly longer than patients who died of the disease in 2008, prior to the conditional approval of the drug for the treatment of the deadly brain cancer. The study appears in the journal Cancer. “There has been a great deal of debate about the effectiveness of bevacizumab in treating patients [...]
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August 20, 2013 | News Briefs

Durham, NC - Older heart patients present unique challenges for determining the optimal dosages of medications, so a new study from researchers at Duke Medicine offers some rare clarity about the use of drugs that are used to treat patients with heart attacks. For certain heart patients older than age 75, a half-dose of the anti-platelet drug prasugrel works about as well as the typical dosage of clopidogrel, according to a team led by the Duke Clinical Research Institute that looked at a sub-s [...]
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August 19, 2013 | News Briefs

Portland, OR - Clinicians have long known that early identification of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) improves a child's long-term health outcome as well as the family's ability to cope with disease. But Latino children are diagnosed with ASDs less often and later — an average of 2.5 years later — than white children and have more severe symptoms at the time of diagnosis. The reasons behind these disparities have been poorly understood, and no studies have investigated pediat [...]
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August 19, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD- Johns Hopkins biomedical engineers have teamed up with clinicians to create a new drug-delivery strategy for a type of central vision loss caused by blood vessel growth at the back of the eye, where such growth should not occur. In addition to testing a new drug that effectively stops such runaway vessel growth in mice, the team gave the drug a biodegradable coating to keep it in the eye longer. If proven effective in humans, the engineers say, it could mean only two or three need [...]
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August 16, 2013 | News Briefs

Essen, DE - Remote ischemic preconditioning just before heart bypass surgery reduces heart damage and may improve long-term survival, according to a new study. Heart muscle damage is a common consequence of complex heart procedures such as bypass surgery and is associated with poorer long-term survival and health problems such as heart attack, according to a journal news release. This study included 162 patients who had remote ischemic preconditioning before heart bypass surgery. A blood press [...]
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August 14, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Genomic sequencing experts at Johns Hopkins partnered with pharmacologists at Stony Brook University to reveal a striking mutational signature of upper urinary tract cancers caused by aristolochic acid, a plant compound contained in herbal remedies used for thousands of years to treat a variety of ailments such as arthritis, gout and inflammation. Their discovery is described in Science Translational Medicine.   Aristolochic acid is found in the plant family “Aris [...]
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August 14, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Black patients preoccupied with racial concerns have higher blood pressure than those who aren’t, according to results of new Johns Hopkins-led research. The findings suggest that heightened race consciousness could at least in part account for the disproportionately high rate of hypertension in black Americans — the highest prevalence of any group in the United States and one of the highest rates in the world. “A preoccupation with race among blacks leads to h [...]
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August 13, 2013 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - A new online training course will help health care professionals conduct fast, evidence-based alcohol screening and brief intervention with youth. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), part of the National Institutes of Health, produced the course jointly with Medscape, a leading provider of online continuing medical education. “Just in time for back-to-school physicals, physicians, physician assistants, and nurses can learn how to use a simple you [...]
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August 12, 2013 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD - The largest genome-wide study of its kind has determined how much five major mental illnesses are traceable to the same common inherited genetic variations. Researchers funded in part by the National Institutes of Health found that the overlap was highest between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder; moderate for bipolar disorder and depression and for ADHD and depression; and low between schizophrenia and autism. Overall, common genetic variation accounted for 17-28 percent of risk [...]
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August 9, 2013 | News Briefs

Tuscon, AZ - Imagine putting on special ultrasound headphones and cheering up when you're feeling blue. Such a device could someday be an option, a new small study suggests. In the study, the researchers found that ultrasound waves applied to specific areas of the brain seemed to improve people's moods. "It's like having a martini. It's not a cure, and we're not claiming one exposure will cure your depression, but it can improve mood," said Dr. Stuart Hameroff, lead author of the study and a p [...]
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August 8, 2013 | News Briefs

Washington, DC - When infants or young children need surgery, does anesthesia affect their developing brains? With more than 1 million children under age 4 requiring anesthesia for surgery in the United States each year, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other health organizations are working together to answer this question. Previous scientific studies in young animals have shown that commonly used anesthetics can be harmful to the developing brain. However, results have been mixed i [...]
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August 6, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - New Johns Hopkins research suggests that people who undergo minimally invasive placement of stents to open clogged leg arteries are significantly less likely than those who have conventional bypass surgery to need a second treatment for the condition within two years. For now, bypass surgery remains the gold standard for treating symptoms of peripheral artery disease (PAD), but the Johns Hopkins researchers are hopeful that further study will confirm the advantage their study sh [...]
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August 5, 2013 | News Briefs

New York, NY - Patients like it and so do health organizations, but electronic communications in clinical care will likely not be widely adopted by primary care physicians unless patient workloads are reduced or they are paid for the time they spend phoning and emailing patients, both during and after office hours. Those are some key conclusions of an in-depth examination by investigators at Weill Cornell Medical College of six diverse medical practices that routinely use electronic communicati [...]
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July 24, 2013 | News Briefs

Clayton, AU - Asthma inhalers could soon become more effective thanks to a clever new way of manufacturing the particles they deliver. The current estimate of 193 million people that suffer from asthma worldwide are heavily reliant on inhalers to alleviate their symptoms, yet current inhaler designs and the typical size range of particles means that a large proportion of the medication propelled into a patient’s throat remains there. Only a fraction reaches the lungs.  Thi [...]
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July 24, 2013 | News Briefs

Philadelphia, PA - Clinicians have, in the past, discontinued aspirin therapy before surgery to avoid bleeding, but this puts patients at higher risk of heart attack and stroke. A new study, “Safety of perioperative aspirin therapy in pancreatic surgery,” published in the journal Surgery by researchers at Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals demonstrates for the first time that patients undergoing major pancreas operations can continue taking aspirin through the morning of surgery w [...]
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July 24, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - Newly published research by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and the Johns Hopkins Institute of Genetic Medicine reveals that a faulty genetic pathway already known for its role in some connective tissue disorders is also a potent player in many types of allergies. Scientists have long understood that allergies are the result of a complex interplay between environment and genes, but now, in what investigators believe is a scientific first, a single genetic pa [...]
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July 24, 2013 | News Briefs

Dallas, TX - Many patients get echocardiograms unnecessarily, according to researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Echocardiograms are safe, but most patients who get them see no change in treatment. Therefore, they are not clinically useful, the researchers said. "The majority of echocardiograms are appropriate in terms of current guidelines," said lead researcher Dr. Susan Matulevicius, an assistant professor in the medical center's cardiology division [...]
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July 23, 2013 | News Briefs

Washington, DC - Combining several strategies is the key to lower risk-standardized 30-day readmission rates (RSRRs) for patients with heart failure (HF), according to new research published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. These findings underscore the importance of collaboration in tackling this crucial issue as health care professionals across the country are continuously working to reduce readmissions. The study looked at survey data from 585 hospitals participating in [...]
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July 22, 2013 | News Briefs

Columbus, OH - Most of the time, it takes decades of accumulating genetic errors for a tumor to develop. While this explains the general occurrence of cancer in adults, it leaves a gap in understanding of the cause of pediatric tumors. In a study published in the July issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found a missing piece of the pediatric cancer puzzle. Changxian Shen, PhD, senior research associate at the Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases a [...]
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July 20, 2013 | News Briefs

Bethesda, MD (HealthDay News) -- Young women who are vaccinated against the human papillomavirus (HPV) not only protect themselves from cervical cancer, but from throat cancer as well, a new study suggests. Many of the increasing number of throat cancers, seen mostly in developed countries, are caused by HPV infection and the HPV vaccine might prevent many of these cancers, the researchers say. "We found the women who had the HPV vaccine had much less infection than the women who hadn't," said [...]
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July 17, 2013 | News Briefs

Silver Spring, MD - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration have allowed marketing of the first medical device based on brain function to help assess attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents 6 to 17 years old. When used as part of a complete medical and psychological examination, the device can help confirm an ADHD diagnosis or a clinician’s decision that further diagnostic testing should focus on ADHD or other medical or behavioral conditions that pro [...]
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July 16, 2013 | News Briefs

Washington, DC - US News & World Report published their annual rankings of the nation's top hospitals today. The rankings, now in their 24th year, cover nearly 5,000 medical centers across the country and span 16 medical specialties, from cancer to neurology & neurosurgery. Hospitals that rank near the top of at least six specialties earn a spot on the Honor Roll. Just 18 distinguished hospitals made this year's list. Back on top is Johns Hopkins swapping places with Mass General fr [...]
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July 10, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - U.S. pediatricians are not using trained language interpreters as often as they should, despite evidence that such services are vital to improving the care of children and families with limited English, according to findings from research conducted jointly by the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and the American Academy of Pediatrics. Using data from two national surveys of pediatricians caring for patients with limited English proficiency, the researchers compared differences in [...]
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July 5, 2013 | News Briefs

Aberdeen, SD - Sanford Aberdeen interventional cardiologist Puneet Sharma, MD, recently made history by utilizing the CorPath Vascular Robotic System to provide a procedural first in the nation. For the first time in the United States, Dr. Sharma utilized the vascular-robotic system with an acute heart-attack patient faster than the national treatment time standard. “The Cor Path Robotic Angioplasty was performed on a patient who had experienced a heart attack and presented to the Sanford [...]
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July 3, 2013 | News Briefs

Sioux Falls, SD –Sanford Heart Hospital in Sioux Falls now offers a new, less-invasive approach to harvest the radial artery for coronary bypass patients, using a scope to minimize scarring and accelerate recovery time. Typically, the vein used for the bypass grafts is removed from the inside of the leg through a long incision that extends from the ankle to the groin. This traditional method leaves not only a long, visible scar, but some patients have experienced more pain from the incisi [...]
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July 2, 2013 | News Briefs

New York, NY (Reuters Health) - Having sales representatives from medical device companies at hospitals may influence which products doctors use and ultimately drive up costs, according to a new study from Canada. Researchers found that doctors were more likely to use a company's drug-coated heart stent when one of its sales representatives visited their hospital, which resulted in about a $250 higher bill per case. "We need to evaluate carefully any interactions with medical industry to ensur [...]
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June 24, 2013 | News Briefs

FDA Reviews "Smart" Device that Reduces Low Blood Glucose Levels Overnight     Chicago, IL - In a major advance in the development of an artificial pancreas, researchers have shown that an insulin pump can be programmed to temporarily shut off when blood glucose levels dip too low, successfully reducing the duration and incidence of nighttime hypoglycemia, according to study results published in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented concurrently at the American Diabete [...]
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June 18, 2013 | News Briefs

PORTLAND, OR — An analysis by the Evidence-based Practice Center at Oregon Health & Science University has found that previously published clinical trial studies about a controversial bone growth product used in spinal surgeries overstated the product's effectiveness. The OHSU analysis found the product offered no real benefit over bone grafts traditionally used in such surgeries and also found that previous studies had underreported harms that occurred in the studies. All but on [...]
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June 17, 2013 | News Briefs

New York, NY - NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, along with its affiliated medical schools, Weill Cornell Medical College and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, celebrated the dedication of its new Center for Autism and the Developing Brain, located at the hospital's Westchester campus in White Plains. Developed in collaboration with New York Collaborates for Autism, the 11,000-square-foot facility will provide comprehensive services to people with autism spectrum disorders at [...]
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June 14, 2013 | News Briefs

227 Representatives Signed on to an Effort to Protect Small Businesses and Medicare Patients In a rare act of bipartisan agreement in the House of Representatives, 227 members of Congress have signed on to a letter written by Congressman Bruce Braley (D-IA) and Congressman Glenn Thompson (R-PA) expressing serious concerns about Medicare’s Competitive Bidding Program for Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and Supplies. The group, a bipartisan Congressional majority, called o [...]
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June 12, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - A team of Johns Hopkins researchers working with animals has developed a vaccine that prevents the virulent TB bacterium from invading the brain and causing the highly lethal condition TB meningitis. TB brain infections often cause serious brain damage and death even when recognized and treated promptly, researchers say. This is so because many drugs currently used to treat resistant TB strains cannot cross the so-called brain-blood barrier, which stops pathogens from entering th [...]
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June 11, 2013 | News Briefs

Columbus, OH - Nationwide Children’s Hospital recently developed an online resource to help parents manage their child’s diabetes more effectively and care for their health at home. The “Diabetes Calculator for Kids,” a first of its kind electronic tool geared toward the pediatric patient, allows parents, caregivers and the adolescent patient themselves to create an individualized chart which calculates the correct insulin dosage that should be given prior to eating. The [...]
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June 10, 2013 | News Briefs

Los Angeles, CA - Women with hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) who take antihistamines to help them sleep through their debilitating morning sickness are significantly more likely to experience adverse pregnancy outcomes, including low birth weight babies and premature births, a UCLA study has found. The findings, the first to link antihistamine use to adverse pregnancy outcomes, are important because babies born before 37 weeks often are hospitalized longer than full term babies, can experience [...]
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June 4, 2013 | News Briefs

Implications from allergies to MS and cancer   Bethesda, MD - Scientists at the National Institutes of Health, and their colleagues, have discovered that a gene called BACH2 may play a central role in the development of diverse allergic and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, asthma, Crohn's disease, celiac disease, and type-1 diabetes. In autoimmune diseases, the immune system attacks normal cells and tissues in the body that are generally recognized as “self” an [...]
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June 4, 2013 | News Briefs

Corpus Christi, TX - While antibiotics can’t kill deadly “superbug” bacteria, a researcher at Texas A&M University- Corpus Christi has developed an amazing new technology that can. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) says antibiotic resistant “superbugs” are the single greatest health threat of our time. The CDC even goes as far as to warn of an impending “antibiotic apocalypse.”  Just one of the so-called “superbugs,” MRSA, kills m [...]
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June 3, 2013 | News Briefs

Aurora, CO – American Sentinel University, has developed a Bachelor of Science Nursing (BSN) Readiness Worksheet to help nurses assess how they feel about continuing their education and gauge their readiness to pursue a BSN. Nurses can print out the complimentary worksheet, respond to ten statements and then tally their score results to see how they rate on a BSN-readiness scale. New industry standards and complexities of patient care call for nurses to receive additional education beyond [...]
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June 3, 2013 | News Briefs

Columbus, OH - In the first study of its kind in the United States, researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospitalwill examine the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy alone to treat appendicitis in children, research that could allow patients to avoid a surgery many may not need. The $1.6 million project also will explore the impact that involving children and their parents in medical decision-making may have on a child’s response to treatment. Appendicitis, caused by a bacterial inf [...]
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June 1, 2013 | News Briefs

Portland, OR - The Food and Drug Administration granted 510(k) clearance to a muscle and joint rehabilitation medical device developed by OHSU Scientist Dr. Paul Cordo, Ph.D., and AMES Technology, Inc. AMES is an Oregon Health & Science University spinoff company established to transform Dr. Cordo's OHSU research findings into a rehabilitation medical device for use in hospitals and clinics. AMES anticipates delivering the device to hospitals and clinics in early 2014. The typical pati [...]
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May 30, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - The temporary placement of umbrella-like, metal mesh filters in abdominal veins to stop potentially lethal blood clots from traveling to the lungs during and after weight loss surgery may actually increase the risk of death in morbidly obese patients, according to new Johns Hopkins research. The study’s findings, reported in the journal JAMA Surgery, suggest that more tried-and-true measures to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) and its deadlier cousin pulmonary embolism [...]
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May 30, 2013 | News Briefs

Stony Brook, NY – A team of hand surgeons at Stony Brook University Hospital (SBUH) successfully reattached the hands of a 53-year-old sheet metal worker from Staten Island, NY, after an accident nearly severed them. Jason Ganz, MD, a plastic surgeon who specializes in microsurgical limb reattachment at SBUH, performed the eight-hour surgery on Kenneth Klapak with Mark Epstein, MD, a plastic surgeon in Stony Brook, NY, assisted by Lauren Grossman, MD, and Mark Braunstein, MD, hand fellows [...]
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May 11, 2013 | News Briefs

Emerson, NJ – Medical-Horizons.net, has announced the addition of a new career advancement section, slated to open June 3, 2013. Health care professionals and managers who regularly visit Medical-Horizons.net to explore new procedures, improvements in patient and staff safety and efficiency, will soon be able to also plot new career paths via the site. The new section will feature clinical and administrative job openings from across the country as well as access to discounted Continuing [...]
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May 10, 2013 | News Briefs

Emerson, NJ – Visitors to the 2013 National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition (NTI) in Boston will have three chances to win a 5-Day/4-Night stay at Walt Disney World in Florida. The trip, offered as part of Medical-Horizon.Net’s participation in the NTI, is design to say “Thank You” to the nursing community for their commitment to Critical Care. Medical-Horizons.net, which works to advance healthcare by sharing the best ideas from the nation’s top f [...]
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May 9, 2013 | News Briefs

PORTLAND, OR – Of course pregnant women are advised not to smoke during pregnancy because it can harm the baby's lungs and lead to wheezing and asthma, among other problems. If a woman absolutely can't kick the habit, taking vitamin C during pregnancy may improve her newborn's lung function and prevent wheezing in the first year of life, according to a study presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Washington, DC. "Vitamin C is a simple, safe and inexpens [...]
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April 30, 2013 | News Briefs

Model developed to be replicated at hospitals nationwide   Chicago, IL – While all heart attacks have the potential to be deadly, a ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is particularly severe and referred to as the “widow maker.” Prompt emergency treatment of a coronary angioplasty, or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), is essential. An interventional cardiologist will feed a deflated balloon into the artery to the blockage where it is then inflated [...]
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April 23, 2013 | News Briefs

Girls’ liver was separated last year; final separation on Monday   Richmond, VA – Six-month-old conjoined twins from Franklin, Va., were surgically separated at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU in a 14-hour operation on Monday that completed a series of procedures begun last year, including the division of their liver. A’zhari and A’zhiah Jones are in stable condition in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, where they spent the first six months of the [...]
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April 15, 2013 | News Briefs

Patients with Neuralgia Find Relief After Cryoneurolysis Procedures Stony Brook, NY – For the millions of Americans who rely on pain medications for neuralgia, an emerging non-pharmacological treatment may offer relief. By placing a tiny ball of ice on damaged nerves by way of a minimally invasive interventional radiology treatment called cryoneurolysis, William Moore, MD, a thoracic interventional radiologist at Stony Brook University School of Medicine, is able to safely short circuit c [...]
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April 9, 2013 | News Briefs

Baltimore, MD - As hospitals strive to improve patient safety and quality of medical care, they should consider widespread use of existing video recording systems already in place to document procedures, to use as a teaching tool and to figure out what’s going right or wrong. In a commentary published online ahead of print in the April 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, surgeon and patient safety expert Martin Makary, M.D., M.P.H., argues that such use of video r [...]
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March 13, 2013 | News Briefs

Researchers use a type of stem cells from human adipose tissue to chase migrating cancer cells   Baltimore, MD - In laboratory studies, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have found that stem cells from a patient’s own fat may have the potential to deliver new treatments directly into the brain after the surgical removal of a glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of brain tumor. The investigators say so-called mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have an unexplained ability to [...]
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March 13, 2013 | News Briefs

Dallas, TX - Policy and practice changes by healthcare institutions, providers and others could greatly improve medical care and improve survival for people who have a cardiac arrest in the hospital, according to an American Heart Association consensus statement in its journal, Circulation. Statement Highlights: Improving the readiness of hospitals and healthcare providers to deliver science-based, high quality care can improve survival from in-hospital cardiac arrest. Increa [...]
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March 7, 2013 | News Briefs

Philadelphia, PA - Over the past 12 years, improving patient safety has been the focus of considerable public and professional interest. Although such efforts required changes in policies; education; workforce; and health care financing, organization, and delivery, the most important gap has arguably been in research. Specifically, to improve patient safety we needed to identify hazards, determine how to measure them accurately, and identify solutions that work to reduce patient harm.  &nb [...]
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February 28, 2013 | News Briefs

New mouse research in Nature raises hope that human liver stem cells can be similarly grown, transplanted Portland, OR — For decades scientists around the world have attempted to regenerate primary liver cells known as hepatocytes because of their numerous biomedical applications, including hepatitis research, drug metabolism and toxicity studies, as well as transplantation for cirrhosis and other chronic liver conditions. But no lab in the world has been successful in identifying an [...]
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February 27, 2013 | News Briefs

Stony Brook, N.Y.  - Specialists at Stony Brook Medicine’s Cerebrovascular and Stroke Center (CVC) are treating patients with a new generation of blood clot removal devices that show promise in successfully revascularizing stroke patients, including those with large vessel blockages. The Solitaire Flow Restoration Device and the Trevo device, approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2012 to treat stroke caused by the sudden obstruction of a brain blood vessel (acu [...]
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February 25, 2013 | News Briefs

Sarasota, FL –  For the first time in Florida, a physician at Sarasota Memorial Hospital has surgically implanted the first FDA-approved telescope prosthesis for patients with end-stage macular degeneration.   Sarasota Neuro-Ophthalmologist Marc H. Levy, MD, implanted the pea-sized telescope directly into the right eye of 81-year-old Leslie Vlontis, a Venice woman with severe vision loss due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD).  Dr. Levy performed the procedure [...]
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February 22, 2013 | News Briefs

Houston, TX - Recently at Texas Children's Hospital, baby Audrina Cardenas was discharged after a 3 1/2 month stay in the hospital. Audrina was born with her heart outside her chest, a very rare diagnosis known as ectopia cordis.   Dr. Charles D. Fraser (heart surgeon, surgeon-in-chief), Jr., Dr. Larry Hollier (plastic surgeon) and Dr. David Wesson (general surgeon) performed a life-saving surgery on her second day of life to repair her heart. Eight out of one million babies are diagnosed [...]
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January 31, 2013 | News Briefs

Cleveland, OH – Mr. Miller lies on the bed, unable to move but able to explain to the medical staff surrounding him that he has severe chest pains. The staff asks him the usual questions: Are you taking any medications? Do you have a history of heart problems? Mr. Miller responds. He appears to be having some trouble breathing and is sweating profusely. The staff must act quickly to help him. Mr. Miller is one of three high-tech, life-size mannequins now housed in the new MetroHealth Simu [...]
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January 31, 2013 | News Briefs

NEW YORK, NY — NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College have established the Center for Prostate Cancer at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, a comprehensive center dedicated to research into and the treatment of prostate cancer. The new center will be led by Dr. Ashutosh K. Tewari, a renowned urologist, surgeon and prostate cancer researcher. Dr. Tewari is the current director of the LeFrak Center for Robotic Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weil [...]
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January 31, 2013 | News Briefs

Cost remains prohibitive factor, but OHSU survey finds experts believe the scan can help with diagnosis   PORTLAND, OR. ­–  A large majority of the nation's top neurologists say they would use a recently approved amyloid detection brain scan to evaluate their patients for Alzheimer's disease if the scan was paid for by health insurance, according to a survey recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. The U.S. Food and Drug [...]
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November 8, 2012 | News Briefs

  Richmond, VA - A team of Virginia Commonwealth University pediatric surgeons successfully completed the separation of 19-month-old conjoined twins Maria and Teresa Tapia of the Dominican Republic.  The complex, 20-hour procedure commenced Monday around 6 a.m. and was the first surgery of its kind at the Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU. Led by David Lanning, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor in the VCU Department of Surgery and surgeon-in-chief [...]
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