September 23, 2017 |
On The Horizon Archives

January 10, 2017 | On The Horizon

Sioux Falls, SD — Sanford Health is offering the first FDA-approved clinical trial of its kind in the United States, using a person’s own fat-derived adult stem cells to treat shoulder injuries. The trial opened in December and explores if adipose stem cells, which are taken from a participant’s own abdominal fat, can safely repair small and partial thickness tears in the rotator cuff by activating the body’s natural healing processes when injected into the injured area. [...]
Read More...

December 9, 2016 | On The Horizon

Cambridge, UK — Cambridge Consultants recently presented the Axsis surgical robot. With an external body the size of a soda can and instruments only 1.8mm in diameter, they believe the Axsis exemplifies the future of surgical robotics. The prototype’s flexible instruments – as opposed to the rigid ones featured in popular da Vinci systems from Intuitive Surgical – are what allow for the device’s reduced size, eliminating the need for a large range of motion outside [...]
Read More...

October 25, 2016 | On The Horizon

Newcastle University, UK - Neuroscientists at Newcastle University have developed and are beginning the first trial on an electronic device designed to help stroke patients recover control and movement of their hands. The device, the size of a mobile phone, delivers a series of small electrical shocks followed by an audible click to strengthen brain and spinal connections. The experts believe this could revolutionize treatment for patients, providing a wearable solution to the effects of stroke [...]
Read More...

May 13, 2016 | On The Horizon

Durham, NC - A research team from Duke Health has developed an antibody from the body’s own immune system that preferentially attacks cancer cells. The antibody works by targeting a natural defense mechanism that cancer tumors exploit. Cells in the body essentially use a home security system that relies on certain proteins to protect the cell surface and keep it safe. These proteins help the cell avoid injury and even death from unwanted activation of the immune system. In a paper publis [...]
Read More...

February 1, 2016 | On The Horizon

Bethesda, MD - The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded approximately $5 million in funding for 24 research projects seeking to develop non-traditional therapeutics for bacterial infections to help address the growing health threat of antibiotic resistance. Advancing new therapeutic options to combat drug-resistant bacteria is a key goal of the President’s National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Res [...]
Read More...

November 19, 2015 | On The Horizon

New York, NY -- A powerful new test that can reveal untapped therapies for patients with advanced cancers by scanning thousands of their genes will soon be available for patients at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center. The test, EXaCT-1, identifies alterations within tumors -- some of which drive cancerous growth -- on a magnitude up to hundreds of times greater than similar technologies designed to pinpoint the most precise ways of treating the dise [...]
Read More...

August 21, 2015 | On The Horizon

London, ENG - Scientists report that they have developed a urine test that may detect pancreatic cancer at an early stage. Usually, symptoms of this deadly disease do not appear until it is at an advanced stage and has spread, and little can be done to save the patient. Researchers have been looking for a way to screen people for pancreatic cancer in the hopes that early detection might lead to effective treatment. "If this test proves to be as good as we hope, we could make an important diffe [...]
Read More...

July 22, 2015 | On The Horizon

Nashville, TN - Researchers at Vanderbilt University and the National University of Singapore have determined the structure of a human monoclonal antibody which, in an animal model, strongly neutralizes a type of the potentially lethal dengue virus. The finding, reported in the journal Science, could lead to the first effective therapies and vaccines against dengue, a complex of four distinct but related mosquito-borne viruses that infect about 390 million people a year and which are [...]
Read More...

July 2, 2015 | On The Horizon

Baltimore, MD - The Johns Hopkins University and Bayer HealthCare have entered into a five-year collaboration agreement to jointly develop new ophthalmic therapies targeting retinal diseases. The goal of the strategic research alliance is to accelerate the translation of innovative approaches from the laboratory to the clinic, ultimately offering patients new treatment options for several retinal diseases. Under the agreement, researchers at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins and [...]
Read More...

June 24, 2015 | On The Horizon

Charlottesville, VA - Groundbreaking new reproductive research from the School of Medicine has identified key molecular events that could be playing a critical role as sperm and egg fuse to create new life. The findings might one day lead to the creation of a male contraceptive. The discovery by members of John Herr's lab (UVA's Center for Research in Contraceptive and Reproductive Health) has been featured on the cover of the scientific journal Biology of Reproduction. "This report [...]
Read More...

May 15, 2015 | On The Horizon

MARLBOROUGH, Mass - CardioFocus, Inc., a medical device company developing the HeartLight® Endoscopic Ablation System (EAS) for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common cardiac arrhythmia affecting millions globally, today announced its U.S. Pivotal Trial data were presented by co-principal investigator Dr. Vivek Y. Reddy, Professor of Medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.  Speaking today in Boston during the late-breaking clinical trial s [...]
Read More...

December 16, 2014 | On The Horizon

Boston, MA – In a study published yesterday by Nature, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center used a microscopic worm (C. elegans) to identify a new path that could lead to drugs to slow aging and the chronic diseases that often accompany it—and might even lead to better cosmetics. The Joslin team looked at how treatments known to boost longevity in the one-millimeter long C. elegans (including calorie restriction and treatment with the drug rapamycin) affected the exp [...]
Read More...

December 2, 2014 | On The Horizon

Pittsburgh, PA - Researchers from CMU's Machine Learning Department performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans of eight people as they read chapter 9 of "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone." They then analyzed the scans, cubic millimeter by cubic millimeter, for every four-word segment of that chapter. The result was the first integrated computational model of reading, identifying which parts of the brain are responsible for such subprocesses as parsing [...]
Read More...

November 25, 2014 | On The Horizon

Bethesda, MD - Using sophisticated computer-based technology to analyze genetic data obtained from uterine tissue, researchers have identified patterns of genetic activity that can be used to diagnose endometriosis, an often-painful condition that occurs when tissue that normally lines the inside of the uterus grows outside the uterus. The prototype diagnostic method can not only distinguish endometriosis from other disorders of the uterus, but can also identify the severity of the disease. [...]
Read More...

November 14, 2014 | On The Horizon

Atlanta, GA - Needles almost too small to be seen with the unaided eye could be the basis for new treatment options for two of the world’s leading eye diseases: glaucoma and corneal neovascularization. The microneedles, ranging in length from 400 to 700 microns, could provide a new way to deliver drugs to specific areas within the eye relevant to these diseases. By targeting the drugs only to specific parts of the eye instead of the entire eye, researchers hope to increase effectiveness, [...]
Read More...

October 9, 2014 | On The Horizon

Houghton, MI - So many medical professionals encourage women to get mammograms, even though the tests are imperfect at best: only a minority of suspicious mammograms actually leads to a cancer diagnosis. That results in lots of needless worry for women and their families—not to mention the time, discomfort and expense of additional tests, including ultrasounds and biopsies. Recently, a different type of test, ultrasound elastography, has been used to pinpoint possible tumors throughout t [...]
Read More...

September 16, 2014 | On The Horizon

Sacramento, CA - Noriko Satake, UC Davis pediatric oncologist and researcher, has demonstrated in laboratory studies that a new, targeted treatment for leukemia is effective. The research was published in the British Journal of Haematology. “We identified a novel molecular target that is important for the growth of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common cancer in children,” Satake said. “We developed a unique treatment approach using a d [...]
Read More...

August 25, 2014 | On The Horizon

New York, NY — Research from Columbia University Medical Center shows that nerves may play a critical role in stomach cancer growth and that blocking nerve signals using surgery or Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) could be an effective treatment for the disease. The study was conducted by the laboratory of Timothy C. Wang, MD, in collaboration with Duan Chen, MD, PhD, in Norway and is published in Science Translational Medicine. “Scientists have long observed that human and mous [...]
Read More...

August 12, 2014 | On The Horizon

Bethesda, MD - Bioengineers have created three-dimensional brain-like tissue that functions like and has structural features similar to tissue in the rat brain and that can be kept alive in the lab for more than two months. As a first demonstration of its potential, researchers used the brain-like tissue to study chemical and electrical changes that occur immediately following traumatic brain injury and, in a separate experiment, changes that occur in response to a drug. The tissue could prov [...]
Read More...

July 15, 2014 | On The Horizon

Baltimore, MD - Without prompt care, a badly wounded soldier can easily bleed to death while being transported to a distant medical station. Traditional treatments — tourniquets and medicated gauze pads — often cannot stop the blood loss from a deep wound at the neck, shoulder or groin. To give these soldiers a fighting chance at survival, Johns Hopkins undergraduates have invented an injectable foam system designed to stop profuse bleeding from a wound where a limb or the head [...]
Read More...

July 2, 2014 | On The Horizon

Bethesda, MD - Researchers have developed a new supercooling technique to increase the amount of time human organs could remain viable outside the body. This study was conducted in rats, and if it succeeds in humans, it would enable a world-wide allocation of donor organs, saving more lives. The research is supported by National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease (NIDDK), both parts of the National I [...]
Read More...

June 17, 2014 | On The Horizon

Gainesville, FL — Combining two different medications could help patients with Type 1 diabetes at least partially regain the ability to produce their own insulin, a University of Florida study has shown.  Michael Haller, M.D., a pediatric endocrinologist, likens his approach to treating Type 1 diabetes to a game of cops and robbers. First, he ferrets out problematic cells of the immune system that could be behind a patient’s inability to produce insulin and wipes them out with [...]
Read More...

April 23, 2014 | On The Horizon

Chicago, IL - In a study that included more than 71,000 stroke patients, implementation of a quality initiative was associated with improvement in the time to treatment and a lower risk of in-hospital death, intracranial hemorrhage (bleeding in the brain), and an increase in the portion of patients discharged to their home, according to the study appearing in the April issue of JAMA, a neurology theme issue. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA; an enzyme that helps dissolve c [...]
Read More...

March 25, 2014 | On The Horizon

New York, NY - The tumor suppressor p53 does all it can to prevent oncogenes from transforming normal cells into tumor cells by killing defective cells or causing them to become inactive. Sometimes oncogenes manage to initiate tumor development in the presence of p53, but, even then, the tumor suppressor doesn’t give up and focuses its efforts instead on limiting the tumor’s ability to invade and metastasize. A study in The Journal of Cell Biology uncovers one way that p53 [...]
Read More...

February 17, 2014 | On The Horizon

Galveston, TX - For the first time, scientists have created human lungs in a lab -- an exciting step forward in regenerative medicine, but an advance that likely won't help patients for many years. "It's so darn cool," said Joan Nichols, a researcher at the University of Texas Medical Branch. "It's been science fiction and we're moving into science fact." If the lungs work -- and that's a big if -- they could help the more than 1,600 people awaiting a lung transplant. Lungs are one of many [...]
Read More...

January 28, 2014 | On The Horizon

Boston, MA - Researchers developed a new tissue adhesive that is biodegradable, biocompatible, and easily manipulated. It could allow for less invasive surgeries that don’t require sutures or staples. During surgery, reconnecting tissues and attaching prosthetic materials can be a challenge. Suturing can be time-consuming, and staples can damage tissue. Surgical adhesives could solve these problems, but current options have limitations with strength, adhesion, and toxicity. Procedures p [...]
Read More...

January 13, 2014 | On The Horizon

  Houston, TX - Some surprising research findings from scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center suggest it’s possible a simple blood test could be developed to determine whether gene mutations associated with pancreatic cancer exist without the need of locating and testing tumor tissue. This appears possible following the discovery that tiny particles the size of viruses called ‘exosomes,’ which are shed by cancer cells into the blood, contain the [...]
Read More...

December 17, 2013 | On The Horizon

Chicago, IL – Patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with an experimental vaccine made from the patient's own resected tumor tissue showed an improved survival compared with historical patients who received the standard of care alone, according to an analysis of a phase 2 trial of this vaccine that was recently published in the journal Neuro-Oncology and accompanied by an editorial highlighting the importance of the trial. A GBM took the life of former Sen [...]
Read More...

December 4, 2013 | On The Horizon

Toronto, CA - Scientists and surgeons at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have discovered a promising new approach to treating colorectal cancer by disarming the gene that drives self-renewal in stem cells - the root cause of disease, resistance to treatment and relapse.  "This is the first step toward clinically applying the principles of cancer stem cell biology to control cancer growth and advance the development of durable cures," says principal investigator Dr. John Dick about the [...]
Read More...

November 21, 2013 | On The Horizon

St. Louis, MO - To better understand and one day provide improved treatments for depression, addiction and anxiety, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are using tiny, electronic devices to identify and map neural circuits in the brain. The innovative work has been recognized with a rare grant called EUREKA (Exceptional, Unconventional Research Enabling Knowledge Acceleration) that funds high-risk/high-reward projects. The National Institutes of Health [...]
Read More...

November 12, 2013 | On The Horizon

Baltimore, MD - Using scores obtained from cognitive tests, Johns Hopkins researchers think they have developed a model that could help determine whether memory loss in older adults is benign or a stop on the way to Alzheimer’s disease. The risk of developing dementia increases markedly when a person is diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment, a noticeable and measurable decline in intellectual abilities that does not seriously interfere with daily life. But physicians have no reliable w [...]
Read More...

October 18, 2013 | On The Horizon

Baltimore, MD - Johns Hopkins researchers say that by measuring levels of certain proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), they can predict when people will develop the cognitive impairment associated with Alzheimer’s disease years before the first symptoms of memory loss appear. Identifying such biomarkers could provide a long-sought tool to guide earlier use of potential drug treatments to prevent or halt the progression of Alzheimer’s while people are still cognitively normal. To [...]
Read More...

September 24, 2013 | On The Horizon

London, England - Researchers at Imperial College London asked volunteers to donate blood samples just as the swine flu pandemic was getting underway and report any symptoms they experienced over the next two flu seasons. They found that those who avoided severe illness had more CD8 T cells, a type of virus-killing immune cell, in their blood at the start of the pandemic. They believe a vaccine that stimulates the body to produce more of these cells could be effective at preventing flu virus [...]
Read More...

September 12, 2013 | On The Horizon

Harrisburg, PA - The technology that peeks underneath clothing at airport security screening check points has great potential for looking underneath human skin to diagnose cancer at its earliest and most treatable stages, a scientist said here today. The report on efforts to use terahertz radiation — “T-rays” — in early diagnosis of skin cancer was part of the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scienti [...]
Read More...

September 3, 2013 | On The Horizon

Miami, FL - US scientists have identified key risk factors that predict which children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the most common cause of sudden death in young people, are at greatest risk of death or need for heart transplant — information that could help physicians figure out who will benefit most from transplant surgery. "If we knew who was in the gravest danger from this condition, we could evaluate them for early listing for heart transplant and follow them more closely,&rdqu [...]
Read More...

August 27, 2013 | On The Horizon

Baltimore, MD - Johns Hopkins researchers say they have found a specific protein in nearly 100 percent of high-grade meningiomas suggesting a new target for therapies for a cancer that does not respond to current chemotherapy. Importantly, the investigators say, the protein — NY-ESO-1 — is already at the center of a clinical trial underway at the National Cancer Institute. That trial is designed to activate the immune systems of patients with other types of tumors that express the p [...]
Read More...

August 13, 2013 | On The Horizon

Rockville, MD - An investigational malaria vaccine has been found to be safe, to generate an immune system response, and to offer protection against malaria infection in healthy adults, according to the results of an early-stage clinical trial published in the journal Science. The vaccine, known as PfSPZ Vaccine, was developed by scientists at Sanaria Inc., of Rockville, Md. The clinical evaluation was conducted by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) [...]
Read More...

July 23, 2013 | On The Horizon

New York, NY - A team of surgeons and members of the breast cancer program of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center is conducting a two-year pilot study of an innovative microsurgery technique coupled with imaging technology to not only prevent lymphedema but also potentially detect and treat it early. It can be difficult to treat lymphedema, which often requires lifelong therapy with compression garments to prevent lym [...]
Read More...

July 16, 2013 | On The Horizon

New York, NY - Weill Cornell Medical College neurologist Dr. Norman Relkin reported new findings today from the Phase 3 clinical trial of IVIG (intravenous immunoglobulin - a mixture of antibodies derived from the blood of health donors used for over 30 years to control infection and inflammation) in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Boston, Mass. While the primary study outcomes were negative, observations from the subgro [...]
Read More...

June 21, 2013 | On The Horizon

Durham, NC - Duke Medicine researchers have identified a receptor in the nervous system that may be key to preventing epilepsy following a prolonged period of seizures. Their findings from studies in mice, published online in the journal Neuron on June 20, 2013, provide a molecular target for developing drugs to prevent the onset of epilepsy, not just manage the disease’s symptoms. “Unfortunately, there are no preventive therapies for any common disorder of the human nervous system [...]
Read More...

June 12, 2013 | On The Horizon

Bethesda, MD - A team of NIH-supported researchers is the first to show, in mice, an unexpected two-step process that happens during the growth and regeneration of inner ear tip links, the extracellular tethers that link stereocilia. The discovery offers a possible mechanism for potential interventions that could preserve hearing in people whose hearing loss is caused by genetic disorders related to tip link dysfunction. The work was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Comm [...]
Read More...

May 31, 2013 | On The Horizon

In the future, joint replacement therapy might be avoidable   Baltimore, MD - Scientists at Johns Hopkins have turned their view of osteoarthritis (OA) inside out. Literally. Instead of seeing the painful degenerative disease as a problem primarily of the cartilage that cushions joints, they now have evidence that the bone underneath the cartilage is also a key player and exacerbates the damage. In a proof-of-concept experiment, they found that blocking the action of a critical bo [...]
Read More...

May 16, 2013 | On The Horizon

Approved in Europe, Middle East and Africa, US still waits Houston, TX - A device co-developed by a University of Houston physicist to detect the spread of breast cancer and allow physicians to better plan intervention is extending its market reach, bringing it another step closer to clinical trials in the United States. The detecting device, called the SentiMag, uses nano-sized, iron oxide particles which give off strong magnetic signals. Iron oxide particles are already used in MRI co [...]
Read More...

April 11, 2013 | On The Horizon

New rat model will advance Alzheimer’s research Los Angeles, CA - A new genetically engineered lab rat that has the full array of brain changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease supports the idea that increases in a molecule called beta-amyloid in the brain causes the disease, according to a study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience. The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health. “We believe the rats will be an excellent, stringent pre-clinical model fo [...]
Read More...

March 13, 2013 | On The Horizon

St. Louis, MO - Nanoparticles carrying a toxin found in bee venom can destroy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) while leaving surrounding cells unharmed, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown. The finding is an important step toward developing a vaginal gel that may prevent the spread of HIV. “Our hope is that in places where HIV is running rampant, people could use this gel as a preventive measure to stop the initial infection,” says Joshu [...]
Read More...

March 4, 2013 | On The Horizon

Baltimore, MD - A team of researchers from Johns Hopkins Children's Center, the University of Mississippi Medical Center and the University of Massachusetts Medical School describe the first case of a so-called "functional cure" in an HIV-infected infant. The finding, the investigators say, may help pave the way to eliminating HIV infection in children. The case was presented today at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections ( [...]
Read More...

February 25, 2013 | On The Horizon

Los Angeles, CA - A team of UCLA-led researchers has identified a protein with broad virus-fighting properties that potentially could be used as a weapon against deadly human pathogenic viruses such as HIV, Ebola, Rift Valley Fever, Nipah and others designated "priority pathogens" for national biosecurity purposes by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease.   In a study published in the January issue of the journal Immunity, the researchers describe the novel antiviral pr [...]
Read More...

January 31, 2013 | On The Horizon

CHAPEL HILL, N.C.– Results of a clinical trial that began in 2001 show that a gene therapy cocktail conveyed into the brain by a molecular special delivery vehicle may help extend the lives of children with Canavan disease, a rare and fatal neurodegenerative disorder. The form of gene therapy was created and developed at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. The work was spearheaded by R. Jude Samulski, PhD, a study senior author, professor of pharmacology and director of U [...]
Read More...