November 21, 2017 |
Procedures Archives

January 10, 2017 | Procedures

Atlanta, GA — Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a procedure to help fight serious chronic inflammatory diseases. The device, similar in function to a pacemaker, electrically stimulates the vagus nerve while also inhibiting unwanted nerve activity in a targeted manner. Forms of vagus nerve stimulation treatment have already been successfully tested in humans, but Georgia Tech’s introduction of the inhibiting signal could increase the clinical efficacy and [...]
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December 9, 2016 | Procedures

New York, NY — Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering have developed a potentially powerful lymphoma treatment using modified immune cells that distribute proteins to therapeutic effect. In experiments with human tumors transplanted into mice, the new immunotherapy approach produced significant responses, raising hopes that this technique could someday offer an effective way of treating this disease and possibly other cancers. The technique is a new methodology derived from chimeric ant [...]
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October 25, 2016 | Procedures

Washington, DC - For patients who may benefit from a major liver operation to treat cancer, an open abdominal procedure is often the only option. However, a minimally invasive approach that avoids the large open incision may soon be a viable alternative, according to results from a multicenter study presented at the 2016 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons (ACS). The researchers evaluated 1,015 major liver resections (hepatectomies) performed in 2014 at 65 hospitals that parti [...]
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May 13, 2016 | Procedures

Philadelphia, PA –To hear it described, pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE) surgery may sound like something out of a science fiction novel. But, for patients it can be life altering and lifesaving. Temple University Hospital’s PTE Program recently completed its 50th PTE procedure, less than three years since its inception. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rare and often fatal form of elevated blood pressure in the lungs resulting from a blood vessel that [...]
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February 1, 2016 | Procedures

Tucson, AZ - At 23-years-old, Tucson resident Ryan Winfield knew something was wrong when he woke up one morning and felt something pushing on his chest. He was young, healthy and athletic – in fact, he played volleyball just a few days prior – so no need to worry, right? Later that afternoon, he woke up from a nap and was struggling to breathe. “I laid there for a little bit hoping whatever was going on would go away. It went away to a degree, but a few hours later, I was movi [...]
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November 10, 2015 | Procedures

New York, NY - A critical aspect of many cancer surgeries is the removal of nearby lymph nodes, which helps eliminate cancer cells that may have spread from the primary tumor. In some cases, however, removing these lymph nodes causes a debilitating side effect called lymphedema. The lymphatic system is a network of tubes and filters that serves as the body’s waste-disposal system. Removing lymph nodes can create a blockage that prevents fluid waste from draining from the area. This [...]
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July 2, 2015 | Procedures

Westwood, NJ - Dr. Amit Trivedi of Advanced Laparoscopic Associates recently performed the first surgery using the Gastrisail™ at HackensackUMC at Pascack Valley.  The product, invented by Trivedi and brought to the market by Medtronic was developed based on physician need and feedback and will address many issues to enhance the sleeve gastrectomy surgery used on obese patients.  “HackensackUMC at Pascack Valley provides the highest level of quality care in the region an [...]
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June 17, 2015 | Procedures

Houston, TX -The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Houston Methodist Hospital announced the first successful scalp and skull transplantation while also performing kidney and pancreas transplants on a patient, according to a press release from MD Anderson Cancer Center.   The 15-hour surgery was conducted on James Boysen, aged 55 years, who is the first patient to receive the simultaneous craniofacial tissue transplant together with solid organ transplants, according to t [...]
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May 15, 2015 | Procedures

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Down syndrome, the most common chromosomal disorder in America, can be complicated by significant deterioration in movement, speech and functioning in some adolescents and young adults. Physicians previously attributed this regression to depression or early-onset Alzheimer’s, and it has not responded to treatments. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri has found that Catatonia, a treatable disorder, may cause regression in patients with Down s [...]
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December 23, 2014 | Procedures

Philadelphia, PA – A recent report provided anesthesiologists with reassuring data on the safety of caudal nerve block — sometimes called the "kiddie caudal" — for infants and young children undergoing surgery. But an editorial in the January issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia draws attention to some important limitations of the study and to the need for further research on the safety and efficacy of this widely used pediatric anesthesia technique.  [...]
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November 18, 2014 | Procedures

Durham, NC - In more than half of STEMI cases studied recently by Duke Medicine researchers, one or both of the patient’s other arteries were also obstructed, raising questions about whether and when additional procedures might be undertaken. In a study to be published in the Nov. 19, 2014, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, Duke researchers and their colleagues report the first large analysis of how often these secondary blockages occur, along with evidence that th [...]
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November 6, 2014 | Procedures

St. Louis, MO - To ensure that health-care workers are prepared for the threat of Ebola, the Washington School of Medicine, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and St. Louis Children’s Hospital are training those designated to be on the front lines of diagnosing and treating patients with the virus. This includes drills in which mock patients enter the hospital with symptoms that simulate Ebola, and staff members run through the process of diagnosis, isolation and treatmen [...]
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October 8, 2014 | Procedures

Santa Rosa, CA - Claret Medical said Monday that the first U.S. patient had been successfully treated in its efficacy study of the Sentinel cerebral protection system, a small catheter designed to protect the brain from stroke during transcatheter aortic valve replacement and other endovascular procedures. The randomized, controlled and blinded Sentinel trial has enrolled 284 patients in 15 sites nationwide, according to the Santa Rosa, Calif., devicemaker. It is the first clinical study i [...]
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September 15, 2014 | Procedures

Gainesville, FL - Physicians sometimes order cardiac stress tests for symptomless patients out of an abundance of caution, but a University of Florida study found this practice rarely reveals hidden heart issues.  The researchers found few patients, if any, who do not display symptoms of cardiac distress benefited from undergoing stress tests that look for cardiac problems. Their observational study, published online in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology, relates to a campaign called &ldq [...]
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August 25, 2014 | Procedures

Boston, MA - Monthly blood transfusions can substantially reduce the risk of recurrent strokes in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) who have already suffered a silent stroke, according to the results of an international study by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, Vanderbilt University and 27 other medical institutions. Results of the federally funded research described in the Aug. 21 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, show that children with preexi [...]
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August 13, 2014 | Procedures

Houston, TX - Memorial Hermann Southeast Hospital offers an innovative heart procedure, that may be safer and more comfortable for patients, called transradial cardiac catheterization. This new technique allows access to a patient's heart through the wrist, instead of the groin. Since minimally invasive cardiac catheterization was pioneered in the 1950s, the procedure has traditionally been performed by threading a thin tube through the femoral artery in the groin guided by X-rays toward the he [...]
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July 8, 2014 | Procedures

Baltimore, MD - Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center used two relatively simple tactics to significantly reduce the number of unnecessary blood tests to assess symptoms of heart attack and chest pain and to achieve a large decrease in patient charges. The team provided information and education to physicians about proven testing guidelines and made changes to the computerized provider order entry system at the medical center, part of the Johns Hopkins Health System. The guideline [...]
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June 17, 2014 | Procedures

Los Angeles, CA - Surgical residents who received anonymous feedback from their peers through a social networking site on their robotic surgery skills improved more than those who did not receive any peer feedback on their procedures, UCLA researchers found.  The study, appearing online in the peer-reviewed journal Annals of Surgery, is the first to examine the use of social networking to facilitate peer review of surgical procedure videos, said senior author Dr. Jim Hu, UCLA's Henry [...]
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May 28, 2014 | Procedures

New York, NY – A 5-year-old boy diagnosed with early onset scoliosis, a severe curvature of the spine, is the first patient in the New York area to receive a novel treatment using magnetic technology to correct this condition and avoid the need for repetitive spine-lengthening surgeries. An alternative to traditional growing rods, which require 8-10 repeated lengthening surgeries during a child's growing years, the MAGEC device allows surgeons to straighten and correct the spine gr [...]
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May 12, 2014 | Procedures

Chicago, IL – To meet the unique needs of brain tumor patients, the American Brain Tumor Association (ABTA) and the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses (AANN) announce the availability of the first ever clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for the treatment of adults with brain tumors.  The Care of the Adult Patient with a Brain Tumor Clinical Practice Guideline was released today with an educational webinar to follow. The two organizations will release a clinical practice guide [...]
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April 10, 2014 | Procedures

London, UK - Two new articles published in The Lancet report the first ever successful operations in humans to reconstruct the alar wings of the nose (nostrils) (Martin et al), and to implant tissue-engineered vaginal organs in women with a rare syndrome that causes the vagina to be underdeveloped or absent (Atala et al), in both cases using the patients’ own tissue.  In one paper, led by Professor Ivan Martin from the University of Basel in Switzerland, scientists report having engi [...]
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March 20, 2014 | Procedures

Bethesda, MD - Survival of patients with septic shock was the same regardless of whether they received treatment based on specific protocols or the usual high-level standard of care, according to a five-year clinical study. The large-scale randomized trial, named ProCESS for Protocolized Care for Early Septic Shock, was done in 31 academic hospital emergency departments across the country and was funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), a component of the National In [...]
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February 10, 2014 | Procedures

St. Paul, MN - St. Jude Medical, Inc. announced the first U.S. implant in the company’s LEADLESS II pivotal trial designed to evaluate the Nanostim™ leadless pacemaker for U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. The world’s first retrievable, non-surgical pacemaker was implanted at The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City by Dr. Vivek Reddy. The Nanostim leadless pacemaker is designed to be placed directly in the heart witho [...]
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January 27, 2014 | Procedures

  St. Louis, MO - A 33-year-old man from Leasburg, Mo., was the first patient to receive a revolutionary form of highly accurate radiation treatment from the world’s first proton system of its kind. The treatment was administered last month at Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Steven Osborne has a rare type of cancer called chondrosarcoma at the base of his skull. He will under [...]
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January 7, 2014 | Procedures

Houston, TX - Surgeons at the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center (MEDVAMC) recently performed successful groundbreaking minimally invasive vascular procedures on two military Veterans. The surgeons performed the City of Houston’s first implantations of a new type of stent graft, called a fenestrated endograft. Each stent graft (the Zenith Fenestrated AAA Endovascular Graft by Cook Medical) is custom-made from a 3-D computer model of the patient's anatomy, which is based on a spiral CT sc [...]
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December 4, 2013 | Procedures

Chicago, IL – Every time Susan Fischer sees someone lugging around an oxygen container, she wants to pull them aside and tell them, “It can get better.” Fischer, 65, has severe emphysema, also known as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), an ongoing and progressive disease that damages the lungs and makes breathing difficult. With her son’s wedding coming up and her daughter expecting a baby girl, Fischer was determined to not let her condition slow her dow [...]
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November 12, 2013 | Procedures

Los Angeles, CA - Modulating the hormonal environment in which endometrial cancers grow could make tumors significantly more sensitive to a new class of drugs known as PARP inhibitors, UCLA researchers have shown for the first time. The findings could lead to a novel one-two punch therapy to fight endometrial cancers and provide an alternative option for conventional treatments that, particularly in advanced disease, have limited efficacy. Studies on endometrial cancer cell lines have shown th [...]
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October 18, 2013 | Procedures

Philadelphia, PA  — An optical imaging technique that measures metabolic activity in cancer cells can accurately differentiate breast cancer subtypes, and it can detect responses to treatment as early as two days after therapy administration, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. “The process of targeted drug development requires assays that measure drug target engagement and predict the response ( [...]
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September 16, 2013 | Procedures

Houston, TX - When peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients’ vessels are so hardened that it’s impossible for surgeons to push through the blockage, a new technique called retrograde access now gives surgeons an additional path from below. Retrograde access is a delicate procedure that allows surgeons to go through arteries in the foot and work their way upward. Hosam El-Sayed, M.D., an endovascular surgeon with Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center, s [...]
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September 4, 2013 | Procedures

Chicago, IL – Using wireless technology may speed patients’ postoperative recovery following heart surgery and improve post-discharge outcomes, according to a study in the September 2013 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. “This type of technology will transform the assessment of surgical and medical recovery,” said lead study author David J. Cook, MD, from the Mayo Clinic. “When an older patient is hospitalized — whether it’s for surgery or a [...]
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August 22, 2013 | Procedures

Stellenbosch, ZA - Giving antiretroviral therapy (ART) immediately after diagnosis for a limited period of time is more beneficial than postponing treatment in young infants infected with HIV, slowing progression of the disease and delaying the time to starting long-term ART, according to new research published in The Lancet. “This important finding indicates we may be able to temporarily stop treatment and spare infants from some of the toxic effects of continuous ART for a while, if we [...]
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August 12, 2013 | Procedures

Bethesda, MD - Patients with severe vasculitis, or inflammation of the blood vessels, get the same benefits from just 4 doses of the drug rituximab over a month as from the standard daily therapy for 18 months, a new study reports. Severe forms of vasculitis can be caused by the rare autoimmune diseases microscopic polyangiitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis. People with these conditions produce harmful anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, or ANCAs that attack healthy neutrophils. Re [...]
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August 6, 2013 | Procedures

Columbus, OH - A group of pediatric surgeons at hospitals around the country have designed a system to collect and analyze data on surgical outcomes in children – the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) is the first national database able to reliably compare outcomes among different hospitals where children’s surgery is performed. The effort could dramatically improve surgical outcomes in children, say the initiative’s leaders, who published their findings onl [...]
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July 31, 2013 | Procedures

St. Louis, MO - In a retrospective study, Saint Louis University researchers have found that patients with melanoma brain metastases can be treated with large doses of interleukin-2 (HD IL-2), a therapy that triggers the body's own immune system to destroy the cancer cells. The study that was recently published in Chemotherapy Research and Practice, reviews cases of eight patients who underwent this therapy at Saint Louis University. John Richart, M.D., associate professor of internal med [...]
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July 23, 2013 | Procedures

Washington, DC - A new report issued by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and developed in collaboration with 10 other leading professional societies provides detailed criteria to help clinicians optimize the appropriate use of certain noninvasive vascular tests when caring for patients with known or suspected disorders of the venous system. Also included are first-time recommendations for when and how to use these tests to plan for or evaluate dialysis access placement. “Vascular [...]
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July 16, 2013 | Procedures

Stony Brook, NY - Stony Brook University Hospital is performing a new FDA-approved minimally invasive procedure to replace the aortic heart valve through a small chest wall incision without open-heart surgery, as an alternative for patients with limited access to the aorta through their femoral arteries. First performed at Stony Brook University Heart Institute on May 29, the transapical procedure is a new approach to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR). TAVR can be performed by [...]
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July 2, 2013 | Procedures

Galveston, TX - A new non-surgical prostate cancer treatment offered at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston virtually eliminates the side effects of impotence and incontinence that can occur when patients receive the traditional treatment for prostate cancer – surgical prostate removal. UTMB’s Chairman of Radiology Eric Walser, M.D., is one of only a few physicians in the world and the only physician in Texas who performs this groundbreaking procedure. He uses MRI to [...]
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June 14, 2013 | Procedures

Atlanta, GA - Pre-treatment scans of brain activity predicted whether depressed patients would best achieve remission with an antidepressant medication or psychotherapy, in a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.  “Our goal is to develop reliable biomarkers that match an individual patient to the treatment option most likely to be successful, while also avoiding those that will be ineffective,” explained Helen Mayberg, M.D., of Emory University, Atlanta, a [...]
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May 31, 2013 | Procedures

Baltimore, MD - Johns Hopkins scientists report that a 10-minute test for “frailty” first designed to predict whether the elderly can withstand surgery and other physical stress could be useful in assessing the increased risk of death and frequent hospitalization among kidney dialysis patients of any age. In a study described in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, the Johns Hopkins investigators said dialysis patients deemed frail by the simple assessment were more than [...]
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April 12, 2013 | Procedures

Indianapolis, IN – Franciscan St. Francis Health is the first hospital in the United States to implant a new device that could improve the quality of life for patients with aortic valve disease. The On-X® Aortic Prosthetic Valve with Anatomic Sewing Ring is the most advanced mechanical heart valve and first to address the important concern of distorting the adjacent structures within the heart. The innovative valve is the only mechanical valve that matches the contour of the hear [...]
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March 20, 2013 | Procedures

Baltimore, MD - Location, location, location. A new Johns Hopkins Children’s Center study shows the real-estate mantra also holds true when it comes to choosing correct catheter placement in children. The research findings, described online March 18 in JAMA Pediatrics, show that catheters in children inserted in a vessel in the arm or leg and not threaded into a large vein near the heart are nearly four times as likely to dislodge, cause vein inflammation or dangerous blood clots as are c [...]
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February 25, 2013 | Procedures

Northwestern Medicine experts are the first in Illinois to offer new GERD procedure   Chicago, IL - Affecting one in every four Americans, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most prevalent gastrointestinal disease in the United States. Very little has changed in the treatment of this debilitating condition over the last several decades, until the recent FDA approval of the LINX Reflux Management System. Northwestern Memorial Hospital is the first hospital in Illinois and one of [...]
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January 31, 2013 | Procedures

Philadelphia, PA - Temple researchers are testing whether implanting miniature coils in the airways of diseased lungs can improve breathing, activity levels and quality of life for emphysema patients. The coils work by compressing damaged tissue, which allows the healthier parts of the lung to function more efficiently and make breathing easier. The coils are made of Nitinol, a metal commonly used in medical implants, and offer a minimally invasive alternative to lung volume reduction [...]
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